Seize The Day; Save The Bay!

September 21, 2015

Save The Day

On September 26, there will be a rally in Coos Bay from Noon to 6:00 PM to help raise public awareness of the dangers posed by the proposed Jordon Cove LNG project. The family-friendly event is called “Seize the Day; Save the Bay!” and will highlight the clean environment of the bay and the damage to the environment that will occur if this massive fossil fuel project is approved.

Because of all of the hype around job creation and natural gas being a “bridge fuel to a clean energy future” it is critically important to bring public awareness to the reality of LNG export terminals.

The “Seize the Day; Save the Bay!” rally will give you a chance to let our elected officials know that this project and the similar one near Astoria are simply unacceptable and that the people of Oregon say:

  • NO to these morally bankrupt Canadian energy companies intent on making money while pushing Earth further towards ecological collapse
  • NO to taking both private and public property for corporate gain with no public benefit foreign corporations
  • NO to environmental destruction of our scenic coastal ecologies and fisheries
  • NO to living in a high risk blast zone
  • NO to sacrificing our timber resources

For an excellent overview of the proposed Jordan Cove Project go here.

Come on out and help build a better future for future generations of Oregonians.

Information on the Statewide No LNG Coalition which planned this event can be found here.

If you have any questions, please contact the Oregon Sierra Club’s Beyond Gas and Oil Team’s Co-Chair, Gregory Monahan, at

We are about to get FERC’d

September 15, 2015

The Federal Government Prepares to Bless a Catastrophic LNG Project –
Running from Canada to the Columbia

by Ted Gleichman

We are about to get FERC’d in Northwest Oregon and Western Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the agency responsible for awarding the key Federal permission for major fossil-fuels energy infrastructure projects. FERC is now preparing to approve the projects proposed by a hedge fund / conglomerate subsidiary named Oregon LNG: more than $6 billion of huge new natural gas pipelines feeding into a planned massive industrial plant to liquefy this gas for export to Asia.

LNG tanker

The Oregon LNG (OLNG) project set includes:

  • a pipeline from Canada all the way through Washington State to Woodland, where it would tunnel under the Columbia River for a mile into Columbia County, Oregon;
  • a linked pipeline running through Columbia and Clatsop counties to Warrenton, on Young’s Bay, adjacent to Astoria; and
  • a gigantic liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal on the Skipanon River peninsula in Warrenton, protruding into the Columbia River, with docking and LNG transfer facilities for tankers 20 stories tall, with the LNG stored in 19-story tall tanks.

FERC is holding legally-required hearings in Washington and Oregon, but let’s be clear: FERC is 100% funded by the industry, and they have never rejected a major fossil fuels infrastructure project. For protecting the interests of the people of Oregon, the United States, and the world, FERC is a sham, a fraud, and a rubber stamp for an industry rapidly destroying a livable planet.

So why should you consider coming to FERC hearings in Astoria on Monday, September 21, and in Vernonia on Tuesday, September 22? There are three reasons:

  • First and most importantly, we are building a mass movement of opposition, and we need to get to know each other and learn how to work together. If you can come to a hearing, wear red and sign in not just with FERC but also with the Statewide Anti-LNG Coalition organizing team.
  • Second, it is imperative that we show the media, the general public, and Oregon elected officials and agency staff who are watching these hearings closely, that we will not accept these dangerous, destructive projects. We can’t stop them through FERC, but we can through the State of Oregon if we build enough pressure.
  • Finally, it is also important to build a record of opposition, with citizens from all walks of life standing up to the Federal government to object – to use our First Amendment rights to petition for redress of grievances.

Here are a few key talking points you can use for the paltry three minutes FERC allows for members of the public to speak. Feel free to think of your three minutes of oral testimony as an executive summary and then turn in longer written testimony at the hearing, or mail it in afterwards.

The Truth about Fracked Gas and LNG exports:

  • Methane is a major source of global warming and climate disruption; LNG exports and fracked gas production are NOT “climate solutions.”
    – Methane, CH4, is the first hydrocarbon and the smallest hydrocarbon molecule. This miniscule molecule carries with it 86 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide over a 20-year period.
    – Because it is so small, it leaks throughout the supply chain: at the wellhead, in transmission and distribution pipelines, at compressor stations and processing plants, during liquefaction, during ocean going transit, in re-gasification in a foreign port, in overseas distribution, and in end-use facilities.
    – Atmospheric methane levels, like atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, are rising catastrophically, and we must reduce its extraction and use as quickly as possible.
  • Exporting LNG will increase natural gas costs for US households, businesses, and manufacturers, hurting our fragile economy.
    – Supply and demand is a straightforward concept: if major quantities of a commodity are removed from a marketplace and shipped overseas, domestic prices will go up. Natural gas is the most versatile fossil fuel and holds the most complex role in our economy of any fossil fuel.
    – Although we must quickly reduce and eventually eliminate its use for all but perhaps a few specialized manufacturing needs, for now the major urgent requirement is to protect it from corporate export exploitation and keep it in the ground.
  • Corporate power to take property rights with eminent domain and anti-democracy corporate trade powers like the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership abuse the public trust.
    – Eminent domain was designed as a Constitutional provision by our nation’s founders to provide for fair compensation to landowners losing land for the public good. No public good has been demonstrated. For a multinational corporation to take family farms, woodlands, and homes as well as public forests for private profit through foreign export is a gross violation of the public interest.
    – And corporate trade deals that remove the right of the public to be represented by our governmental agencies and U.S. courts are a clear assault on sovereignty and basic American rights.
  • Toxic fracking irreversibly damages community water and land.
    – Industry-secret toxic fracking fluids permanently pollute underground formations with cracks and channels that often link to aquifers and eventually to the surface. Fracking lubricates stressed rock formations and has been proven to cause earthquakes.
    – The mixed gaseous hydrocarbons coming from the fracking wells are mostly methane, but also include butane, propane, ethanes, carbon dioxide, radon, mercury, and other toxins. Especially dangerous for land pollution is “produced water”: permanently polluted water that comes to the surface with the wellhead gases, and then must be disposed of somehow.
    – Fracking zones throughout the U.S. are already permanently damaged from this toxic brew.
  • Siting explosive, toxic facilities on the Oregon coast, guaranteed to suffer the most catastrophic earthquake and tsunami in US history, is outrageous and must not be allowed.
    – The earthquake from the Cascadia Subduction Zone that will hit Warrenton-Astoria will be a Magnitude 9 and generate a tsunami that could be 10 stories tall or more. It has a one-third chance of hitting within the 50-year lifespan of the OLNG plant.
    – No explosive tanker, LNG storage tank, or pipeline can be guaranteed to withstand such force. It will be the mirror image of the Japanese Tohoku-Fukushima earthquake and tsunami of 2011. Check out what the State of Oregon says about seismic hazards here.
  • Communities all along pipelines suffer air and water pollution and risk constant danger from explosive pipeline failures.
    – Pipelines and LNG processing plants always leak, sooner or later, and are at constant risk of catastrophic leaks and explosive failure. In the forest zones of Columbia and Clatsop counties, a pipeline rupture during fire season would create a massive conflagration.
    – When the earthquake hits, the 40-foot sections of the pipeline will rupture at every joint, and then the metal edges will rub and spark for several minutes. This would create a 90-mile line of wildfire across Northwest Oregon at a time when the First Responders are already completely overwhelmed.
    – The reverse is also a serious risk: a natural wildfire can heat and fracture a gas pipeline, even under a clearcut, burning through root systems or heating from above with a flaming tree falling across the pipeline path.
    – Running an explosive pipeline through forests experiencing severe, larger, and more frequent wildfires is a formula for disaster.
  • Jobs that damage our climate are not “good jobs”; we need clean, sustainable renewable energy and earthquake/tsunami protection jobs.
    – We need to rebuild our coastal and inland infrastructure to provide resilience against the coming earthquake, and we need an urgent complete transition to a green energy economy, where renewables, efficiency, and conservation eliminate the CO2 pollution that is rapidly overheating our oceans and atmosphere.
    – Genuine good jobs can be created and funded here and now! It’s up to us to build the political will for new ways to build economic health.

If you cannot attend a hearing and want to submit written testimony, or if you want to expand on your hearing testimony, the FERC deadline to accept additional information and comments is October 6. You can see instructions for submitting comments at

The Bottom Line:

The Oregon LNG plans are essentially a criminal enterprise, aiming at locking in a long-term export plan for fracked gas that would constitute double the amount used now by all the households, businesses, and manufacturers in Oregon. Our state, our nation, and our planet cannot withstand this assault. They must be stopped, and we would be honored to have your help. Thank you!


Ted Gleichman is Co-chair of Oregon Sierra Club Beyond Gas & Oil Team and a member of the National Strategy Team for Sierra Club’s Stop Dirty Fuels Initiative. You can reach Ted at or 503-781-2498.

A Reinvigorated Battle Cry for the Climate by Jessie Bond

August 13, 2015

For years, conversations around global warming have been volleying back and forth between dire predictions and outright denial. Most of the discussion has centered on scientific data and the economic impact of dealing with climate change. But the plea to protect our planet from the worst effects of rising temperatures has not fully resonated because most people have been overlooking an important human motivator: our own morality.

Until now. In May, Pope Francis took a stand and brought the climate change conversation to a new global level. In a 184-page encyclical, the Pope delivered a powerful critique on modern life. He addressed not only the fact that humans have contributed to the degradation of our planet but that we have a moral responsibility to our own and other species. He called for a sweeping “cultural revolution,” and among the many pages offered some guidance for every government, community, and individual. This call to action sparked a renewed energy to confront climate change and the enormous ecological, economic, and social imbalances that are root causes of the crisis.

Many cities across the globe are heeding this call and beginning to roll out plans to combat climate change at the local level. In fact, in the wake of the Pope’s statement, the Portland City Council and Multnomah County Commissioners unanimously voted to adopt the joint 2015 Climate Action Plan. This continues a 20-year legacy: Portland was the first city in the United States to create a plan for cutting carbon in 1993. Total carbon emissions in the U.S. have risen since the 1990s, but Portland’s emissions have actually declined by 14%, while its population has increased by almost a third.

The updated joint city-county plan is intended to strengthen the local effort to reduce carbon emissions by 80% of 1990 levels by 2050. This is the level experts feel is needed worldwide to prevent devastating climate disruption from global warming.

Issues of equity and justice, which have largely been missing from the global climate conversation as Pope Francis points out, are finally getting serious consideration. The city-county plan, which was developed with the help of an equity working group, reflects this. Along with minimizing fossil fuel use, the plan focuses on ensuring that all city and county residents benefit from climate action.

At the Sierra Club we know that ensuring a livable climate for everyone is the biggest challenge of our age. The Oregon Chapter is working to educate the public, mobilize communities, and support the growing and thriving climate movement, and there are many ways you can get involved:

  • Find out what the joint city-county action plan means for Portland and Multnomah County at our Third Thursday event: Our Climate, Our Future: the Portland/Multnomah County Climate Action Plan at 6:30 p.m. at the Sierra Club office.
  • Hear what local faith leaders have to say about the moral implications of the climate crisis and how to build powerful coalitions at our Third Thursday event: Acting on Faith: The Moral Imperative of the Climate Crisis at 6:30 p.m. at the Sierra Club office.
  • Support our Protect State Forests campaign. We are fighting to preserve the Clatsop and Tillamook State Forests, which, as part of the Pacific Northwest temperate forest range, store much of the carbon on the planet.
  • Find out about our new You CAN Corvallis training for youth climate activists to push the Corvallis City Council to pass a climate action plan with significant greenhouse gas emissions targets.

Leaders like Pope Francis remind us that we can better build resilient communities only when everyone is included. It’s the shared human responsibility as Carl Sagan wrote, “to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot.” Taking a moral stand in being good and decent to others and to our world is what is going to help us and other species survive.

Hart Mountain

August 13, 2015
Recently, a group of 10 desert enthusiasts, led by Sierra Club High Desert Committee members, visited the Hart Mountain Antelope Refuge in south-central Oregon. Hart Mountain is a conservation success story, and it was exciting to see how DSC_0052this area has come back to ecological health since grazing was removed  from the refuge nearly twenty years ago and management practices changed. At that time, the antelope population was struggling due to the damage done to the landscape by grazing and fire suppression. Once cattle were removed and prescribed burns started, the landscape, and antelope numbers, have returned to healthy levels. The fires and removing the cattle allowed forbes, herbaceous plants that the antelope depend on, to rejuvenate. This was evident on our hikes, as we were treated to vast stretches of wildflowers, including a hilltop swathed in fragrant lupine. We felt like Dorothy in a poppy field in Oz!
Please help the Sierra Club protect other fragile high desert ecosystems in Oregon. The High Desert Committee currently is working on a campaign to permanently protect 2.5 million acres of wilderness-quality lands in the Owyhee Canyonlands, DSC_0018which is in the far southeast corner of Oregon. Please take a minute to sign the petition at, join us on an outing (see our offerings at  or attend one of our monthly meetings to see what we are working on. The High Desert Committee meets on the first Wednesday of every month at 6:30 pm for a potluck, with the meeting starting at 7:00 pm.
Heidi Dahlin

Stand up for Oregon. No Pipelines. No LNG. Call-in Days of Action! Wednesday August 12th and August 26th (All Day)

August 7, 2015

People from all over the state are standing up to two proposed fracked gas export terminal and pipeline proposals in Oregon and we need you to join us!No LNG Logo

Last week, The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a draft environmental review for the Oregon LNG terminal and pipeline near Astoria Oregon. The Environmental Impact Statement for Oregon LNG didn’t address the impacts to public health and safety, endangered salmon, or the economy. With FERC also planning to issue their Final Impact Statement for Jordan Cove here in Southern Oregon on September 30th, we need our state officials to stand up for Oregon NOW!

Salem LNG Rally-May 26 2015

On Wednesday, August 12th or August 26th please join us for statewide call-in days to flood the offices of  Gov. Brown and our U.S. Senators Merkley and Wyden asking them to stand up for Oregon! Please take 10 minutes on August 12th or August 26th to call and ask Gov. Brown officials to deny key state permits for these projects and prepare to defend Oregon’s interests in court if FERC approves these projects! We also are looking to our federal senators to stand up for Oregon’s right to deny LNG terminals.

Find all the details, phone numbers and talking points for the call-in by clicking here: Call in Day Instructions and Talking Points. It also important that we keep track of how many calls we are making and the impact they have. After you make your calls please take a moment to fill out the tracking form HERE to record the results of your call.

Please spread the word!

______________________________________________________________________________ Support Hike the Pipe! (August 22- September 27)

This summer, a group of Oregonians will hike through 232 miles of beautiful and scenic southwestern Oregon to protest the Jordan Cove pipeline and export terminal. Hike the Pipe is a community action that will draw attention to the communities and ecosystems threatened by the Pacific Connector Pipeline. We need community support to make this project happen! Please learn more about Hike the Pipe by watching the video below and donate to the project today!

Albuquerque Wilderness 50 Celebration – Take-Aways

November 4, 2014
Proxy Falls Three Sisters Wilderness, Oregon, USA

By Thomas Goebel, age 18
Jensen Beach, Florida, USA

I was privileged to attend the Albuquerque 50th Anniversary celebration of the signing of the Wilderness Act by President Johnson. There were two days of local area field trips or a pre-conference training at the Rio Grande Nature Center, followed by four days of panels, keynote speeches, and exhibits at the downtown Hyatt Regency Conference Center and the Albuquerque Convention Center.

I’d like to share some of the thoughts that the Celebration gave me about Wilderness, the Wilderness Act, and lands protection in general; and what they mean to the Sierra Club, as well as all conservation organizations, as we go forward into the 21st Century in a very changed political and public reality.
But first, a bit more about the Celebration.

By Rodney Lough Jr., PRO Happy Valley, Oregon, USA Rodney Lough Jr. Wilderness Collections

By Rodney Lough Jr., PRO
Happy Valley, Oregon, USA
Rodney Lough Jr. Wilderness Collections

The Wilderness50 planning team was created as a corporation with 30 members, including all the key government land agencies and national conservation non-profit organizations. More than a 100 additional organizations, foundations, and businesses provided funding and resources for the celebration. For more on this, go to: This resulted in a six day event in Albuquerque and the surrounding area featuring field trips, training, exhibitions, 84 presenter panels, 20 keynote speakers, and many social events that connected together a broad range of government employees, activists, academics, and business people in celebration of 50 years of Wilderness for the American people. It was exceedingly well planned and executed, a tribute to the many people in our country who care about our natural legacy.

By Joe LeFevre Oswego, New York, USA

By Joe LeFevre
Oswego, New York, USA

With so many exciting events all happening at the same time, no one person could be at even a small percentage of them, so every attendee likely came away with different message. Here’s what I came away with:


Wilderness, and lands protection in general, is in trouble! Even the Wilderness we already have!! As Keynoter Chris Barns (Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center) so eloquently stated: all three support legs of the Wilderness stool are broken. Those are 1) public support, 2) government agency funding and training, and 3) non-profit focus. The latter two are a reflection of the first – a broad erosion in public support for the concept that our pristine public lands need to be protected for future generations.

Lands stewardship is being broadly neglected by the government agencies. This is a result of a lack of funding from, and in many cases, downright hostility by members of Congress to the concept of public lands protection, even to those already protected. This is resulting in an increasing number of destructive activities occurring without preventive action, and even authorization by government agencies of illegal activities on protected lands.
Climate change is threatening the health of all public lands. There is very little planning and no funding to mitigate this threat. The “management” of Wilderness Areas is a controversial issue, but climate change, as well as the century long exclusion of fire, are dramatic human “trammels” upon the naturalness of Wilderness, so we need an intelligent conversation about how we deal with these situations.


Young people!! I looked around and couldn’t believe my eyes – there were young people everywhere. Woo-hoo!
There were so many energetic, intelligent, and eloquent activists from all persuasions: government; non-profit; academic; and public. It gave me great hope.
Universal recognition by all sectors represented that we must do more, much more, to educate and sell the need for lands protection, especially Wilderness, to the Public. It must be our focus, otherwise we will fail in this century to keep the protected lands that we have.

So, what to do?

Educate the Public – We must educate the Public, not just on a generic need for Wilderness or lands protection, but about what it does for them at a personal level: clean water, clean air, solitude, a connection to nature, a home for their favorite animal or tree or flower, or preservation of their favorite place for hiking, hunting, fishing or camping. This education effort needs to become part of everything we do.
Connect with Young People – We need a greater focus on connecting with young people. This can happen by reaching out to the schools, but is becoming an increasing challenge with the narrowing focus on “curriculums”, such as Common Core, and falling public school funding around the country. We must be creative in tailoring our appeal to be part of the school’s curriculum needs. Also, see the next item on stewardship.
Become Stewards – Stewardship must become part of our conservation advocacy program. Sierra Club has not traditionally focused on stewardship, but we must add this to our portfolio. I heard many wonderful stories of agency/non-profit stewardship collaboration that’s making a real difference. It’s a highly effective way to connect with young and old, and get them engaged, educated, and trained. Plus, it creates publicity and legitimacy for all our conservation goals.
Lobby – Every lobbying effort with members of Congress needs to include advocacy for increasing funding for protected lands stewardship. The Wilderness Act and many other laws require the lands agencies to do this, but without funding and direction from Congress, it is not being done.
Use Economics – I was astonished to see photos of Bend Oregon’s Old Mill District on the screen in Albuquerque, but John Sterling of The Conservation Alliance and Ben Alexander from Headwaters Economics used Bend as their primo example for how protected lands can rejuvenate a community. Even where the other benefits from protected lands are rejected as “wasting our resources”, the $ still changes minds. Go to – the amount of locale specific information available there for free is truly amazing.
Open Minded Thinking – We need to question old attitudes about Wilderness management and future lands protection models, as well as our willingness to work with those with whom we disagree. We are facing new challenges with climate change and a burgeoning population. Our old protection models may no longer be possible in many places, but new models may gain acceptance and accomplish our protection goals. Blindly demanding no commercial activities on federal lands or total passivity in Wilderness Areas immediately eliminates us from the conversation about how these areas will be managed. We must be willing to reason together with other interests, or we place ourselves in the same box as the right wing whackos.

Alaska Range Denali Wilderness, Alaska, USA

By Tim Aiken, age 18
Stanford, California, USA

A time of hope:
I came away really uplifted and energized from my six days in Albuquerque. There are many challenges before us, to even retain what we have, but there is a great opportunity to recreate the lands protection movement of the 1950’s and 60’s. Climate change will eventually demand a great rethinking of how we interact with our natural world. That will be our opportunity. We must prepare and be ready to take that opportunity.
Larry Pennington, Oregon Chapter Chair

Vote Yes on Measure 88

October 7, 2014

The Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club has joined dozens of other organizations in endorsing a YES position on Measure 88.

Voting yes on Measure 88 will mean that residents of Oregon, regardless of their citizenship status, will have the option to obtain a driver’s card so they can legally drive to work, take a family member to the hospital, or attend a rally. And yes, even access trails and wilderness areas accessible only by vehicle. This will make the roads safer for all of us and allow people to contribute to their own well-being and the state’s economy.


Measure 88 is also a step toward creating a more inclusive, democratic society, something the Sierra Club is deeply committed to. It’s even stated in the National Sierra Club Board policy: 11 million immigrants in our country ultimately need a pathway to citizenship so they can participate as full members of our democracy.

As an advocacy group, we value and depend on civic engagement from all communities. Undocumented immigrants are often most affected by environmental pollution and cannot speak out without fear of deportation. All people must have a voice if we are to achieve the conservation victories that protect our natural resources and help our communities thrive.

Learn more about Measure 88 and vote YES this November!

Not yet registered to vote? There’s still time! Register here.


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