Stopping LNG Export through Oregon: Both Projects Collapse!

April 18, 2016

By Ted Gleichman

They seemed insurmountable at first: two massive methane export projects in under-employed Oregon, one on the south bank of the Lower Columbia, and the other grabbing a struggling industrial port on the southern Oregon Coast.  Each $7 billion-plus plan required hundreds of miles of new pipelines, feeding fracked gas from the Rockies and Western Canada into enormous new processing plants for liquefied natural gas (LNG) at minus-261° Fahrenheit, for “terrorist-magnet” tanker export, with mandatory Coast Guard protection, embargoing other shipping hundreds of days per year, to ship LNG to Asia.

LNG tanker

Long-term profits would be tens of billions, with thousands of construction jobs.  And natural gas was the bridge to the future, twice as good as good ol’ coal.  Developers rolled in with instantaneous political support.  Lonely enviros and community activists fighting LNG faced epic headwinds: quixotic struggles by definition.

What a difference a decade makes.  Suddenly this spring, our long-term opposition has blended with global market reversal on oil and gas pricing, scientific evolution on fossil fuel climate impact, and comprehensive evidence of irredeemable ecological destruction to put both projects on the edge of oblivion.  

On Friday, March 11, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) quietly published an unprecedented decision: the commissioners voted unanimously to deny licenses to the Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline (PCGP) and the Jordan Cove Energy Project (JCEP).  In Oregon and nationally, almost all observers were shocked: FERC has been widely seen as just a rubber stamp.

If this decision holds, 232 miles of 36-inch explosive pipeline will not slice along a new perpetual clearcut as wide as an interstate highway, and the Port of Coos Bay will not be dominated by gargantuan towers built on a sand spit for LNG that Asia can now get more cheaply elsewhere.

And then, on Friday afternoon, April 15, an unnamed official for Oregon LNG (OLNG), requesting anonymity, telephoned the mayor and planning director of Warrenton, the small town on the Lower Columbia where OLNG planned to build their LNG export terminal on dredging spoils.  The OLNG staffer said their struggling parent company, Leucadia National Corp., would no longer fund their development, so they will withdraw their land use application and abandon terminal and pipeline permitting fights. Simultaneously, an OLNG lawyer emailed the state Department of Environmental Quality, withdrawing state permit requests, and copied the Oregon Attorney General.

If this decision extends to every aspect of OLNG, they will withdraw their pending Final Environmental Impact Statement with FERC, cancelling their planned 87-mile pipeline across Northern Oregon (and perhaps killing another 130 miles of new gas pipeline from Canada through Washington State) to feed a terminal on unstable soil.

Each project was planned, insanely, for the largest, most dangerous earthquake and tsunami zone in North America, the Cascadia subduction zone.  The Pacific Northwest is guaranteed to experience a Magnitude 8-9 seismic monstrosity; coastal elevations may change by some 30 feet in about eight minutes.  This last hit in 1700; it averages every 250 years; and has about a 1/3 chance of striking during the projected lifespan of these projects.

Together, OLNG and JCEP/PCGP planned to export more than two billion cubic feet of refined methane per day: about three times the Oregon daily use.  But now we know there is no fossil fuels solution to the fossil fuels crisis: fugitive methane is a much worse climate disrupter than carbon dioxide.

windmillsSo the jobs and climate arguments are now flipped.  Oregon needs a two-part sustainability program: resilience and renewables.  We must rebuild First-Responder, transportation, and community infrastructure for resilience against our earthquake, and we must convert our energy economy to decentralized and utility-scale smart-grid renewables, bolstered with conservation and efficiency.

The impending demise of the only two LNG export projects on the US West Coast is giving us a teachable moment to help heal our corner of the world, for the better: maybe forever.


Ted Gleichman is former chair of and current policy advisor for the Oregon Chapter Beyond Gas & Oil Team, and a member of the national strategy team for the National Sierra Club Stop Dirty Fuels Initiative.

Victory! Jordan Cove LNG Pipeline Denied

March 18, 2016

By Francesca Varela

How does this sound for a bad-news proposal? Stretch a 232-mile pipeline across forests and backyards, old-growth cedars and mushroom-sided streams, halfway across the state. Gouge the forest. Scar it. Fill said pipeline with natural gas—one of the dirtiest fuels available to us. Build a terminal in Coos Bay. Convert natural gas to liquid—AKA liquefied natural gas (LNG). Ship LNG to Asia. Stand at the edge of the wide Pacific and know that, across from it, the fuels will be burned and the greenhouse gases will rise and glisten and warm, and the entire world will be altered by it, perhaps beyond all of the gas pipeline

This proposed export facility (at first intended to be an import facility) was named the Jordan Cove Energy Project, and for over a decade its impending construction was fervently opposed by environmental organizations, including the Sierra Club. Activists held protests and raised awareness, collaborating with landowners whose properties would have been intersected by the adjoining Pacific Connector Pipeline. Their hard work paid off when, on Friday, March 11, the project’s application was denied by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).

Salem LNG Rally-May 26 2015

According to the FERC report, the denial has been issued “because the record does not support a finding that the public benefits of the Pacific Connector Pipeline outweigh the adverse effects on landowners.” And because the Jordan Cove export facility would be useless without the Pacific Connector Pipeline feeding it natural gas, FERC denied that application as well.

This is a victory for the many volunteers involved, for the communities who would have been impacted by eminent domain, and, of course, for the environment. Had the pipeline been approved, its construction would have led to expansive clear-cuts, denuding streams of important riparian shade that salmon and other fish rely on, and reducing habitat for endangered species like the northern spotted owl. Had the oceanside export facility also been approved, the Coos Bay estuary would have been dredged and degraded, negatively impacting already fragile marine life.

LNG tankerThe FERC denial is a good sign, but it’s not the end; there’s still a chance that the proposal could be reconsidered if the companies behind it—Veresen Inc. and Williams Partners—are able to convince officials of the market value and economic need of their project during the rehearing process. In fact, the entire approvals process is a complicated, many-stepped ordeal involving multiple permits and regulating agencies, both state and federal.

There are still many permits pending with various agencies of the State of Oregon, and it is not clear that those processes will be halted just because of the FERC denial. In order to ensure that the Jordan Cove Energy Project is killed, officially and completely, we need to continue voicing our own disapproval by contacting Governor Kate Brown and asking her to support the FERC decision and shut down the project for good. See volunteer leader Ted Gleichman’s blog post for more info!


Volunteer Spotlight: FERC rejects Jordan Cove LNG!!!

March 18, 2016

(Here’s how it happened: Three and a Half Zeros, Plus a Minus)

By Ted Gleichman

Among the most important values of Sierra Club to our planet and society are effective grassroots action, long-term attention to detail, and structured commitment to change.  With the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s astounding decision against the Jordan Cove LNG export terminal and the Pacific Connector Pipeline projects (JC/PCP), we are reaping the fruit of many years of work, within Sierra Club and with many important and expert allies in coalition.

A sample of what we're trying to protect (Photo credit: Ted Gleichman)

A sample of what we’re trying to protect (Photo credit: Ted Gleichman)

On March 6, I told 35 activists assembled in Eugene for our quarterly anti-LNG strategy session that I thought there was a genuine chance that FERC would deny Federal approval and eminent domain for JC/PCP.  (People scoffed.)  On March 11, FERC unanimously rejected the pipeline, and therefore the terminal!

I’m not a prophet, nor was I the first Oregon activist to figure this out.  That honor goes to a landowner couple on the PCP route, Deb Evans and Ron Schaaf of Jackson and Klamath counties, who dug deep into FERC history, policy, and procedures, and simultaneously fought hard to help other landowners resist the arrogant low-dollar easement offers that JC/PCP tossed at them.  Deb and Ron put together – and, with other landowners, paid for – a formal legal filing with FERC that the Commissioners explicitly praised in their denial order.

Ron and Deb also schooled me, in exhaustive detail, over a long weekend in early January at their home in the mountains above Ashland.  We did a thorough and careful analysis (aided, fortunately, by a couple of bottles of good wine).  Here’s why we concluded this ground-breaking FERC rejection was possible:

  • Veresen Inc., the Alberta oil and gas shipper that owns Jordan Cove and co-owns PCP with Williams (the brutal Oklahoma pipeline company) is a financial mess.  They barely make money and their market capitalization has dropped by more than half since the beginning of the oil crash, to less than $2 billion.  In recent months, they’ve been trying cut back on their miniscule financial aid commitments to Coos Bay and the pipeline communities.
  • After 11 years of promoting JC/PCP, Veresen had netted a grand total of “three and a half zeros”: Zero contracts to sell gas in Asia; zero supplier contracts with frackers in the Rockies and Alberta; zero sources of financing for this $7.5 billion project set, which they can’t afford to build on their own – and fewer than 5% of landowners on the pipeline route who had sold them easements.
  • FERC traditionally is all about the so-called “free market”: they almost invariably approve any corporation that has the financial means to plan, buy, build, and sell an energy project.  But Veresen has been failing all four of those market tests, leading to these 3½ Zeros.
  • Eminent domain has become increasingly toxic.  People and politicians of all stripes hate the savage assaults on farms, woodlands, businesses, and family homes by frackers and pipeline companies all over the United States.  Eminent domain is supposed to be a fair and open public process for the common good – not a private-profit work-around for greedy victimization.
  • FERC had never approved eminent domain for such a large number of families (some 630 landowners) with so few negotiated easements.  Our battle against PCP, with both grass-roots and professional environmental leadership from Sierra Club and many other wonderful organizations,  has been one of the most effective and politically-charged in the country.
  • FERC has been under severe political pressure nationally and especially on the East Coast, in the brutally-fracked Marcellus shale regions of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio.  LNG approvals by FERC in Maryland, Louisiana, and Texas have generated massive protests there and across the environmental movement.
  • We believe FERC was looking for an especially-weak project to deny, to be able to say that they are not just a rubber stamp. Hence, for an agency looking to defend itself, and to avoid the very worst of eminent domain, this gave us “plus a minus.”
Raging Grannies at Hike the Pipe

Raging Grannies at a rally against the pipeline and terminal, Coos Bay, September 2015 (Credit: Ted Gleichman)

So this remarkable FERC decision gives Oregon a major victory that thousands of people from many groups have fought for, now reverberating all over the country. In their ruling, unprecedented for any LNG or pipeline proposal, the FERC Commissioners explicitly said that a company with no contracts to sell a product (which, as noted, it doesn’t yet own, through a project that it can’t afford to build) could not demonstrate overall “public benefit” adequate to justify eminent domain harm to so many “landowners and communities.”

FERC also explicitly called out the work of National Sierra Club senior attorney Nathan Matthews, the brilliant LNG specialist within our expert Environmental Law Program.  The Commissioners noted in detail the specific elements of our condemnation of JC/PCP and the FERC staff’s construction of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS).  We have every right to be proud of the Member-owned and staff-built organization that has evolved since John Muir founded it 124 years ago.

Part of the Ruby Pipeline natural gas compressor and transfer station, near Malin in Klamath County

Part of the Ruby Pipeline natural gas compressor and transfer station, near Malin in Klamath County (Credit: Ted Gleichman)

What’s Next?  Because LNG in Oregon is Not Dead Yet

FERC put JC/PCP in a coffin, but they also gave them a path to climb out, saying in essence, come see us again if you get any contracts to sell LNG.  So we are not done.

Plus we also face Oregon LNG, which is proceeding with their plans for massive pipelines through Washington from Canada, across Northern Oregon, and feeding an LNG export terminal in Warrenton, across from Astoria on the Lower Columbia. This $7 billion project is financially strong but politically and technically very weak. FERC staff will issue the Oregon LNG FEIS on June 3.  We need to add Oregon LNG to the JC/PCP coffin, then nail it shut on both of them.

So our next post will include details on our coffin-completion construction plans – stay tuned!  The focus now will be on the State of Oregon and Governor Kate Brown: they now need to do their part, and we will keep you posted.

In the meantime, please do two very important things:

  1. If you have the capacity to work with the Oregon Chapter Beyond Gas & Oil Team, please contact team chair Gregory Monahan at We’ve got a lot to do, on LNG and many other fossil fuel attacks!
  2. If you have the capacity to help support the Oregon Chapter even more, please dig deep!  You can make a direct donation, upgrade your Sierra Club membership level, or give a gift membership.  Remember: we Members own the place – so we have an obligation to stewardship.  We have a great staff at the Oregon Chapter, and we need to keep them fed and watered!

From a long-time volunteer Member-leader: thanks for all you do!

Ted Gleichman — 503-781-2498 — Twitter: @tedgleichman
Member, National Strategy Team & National Delivery Team, Stop Dirty Fuels Initiative, Sierra Club
Policy Advisor, Beyond Gas & Oil Team, Oregon Sierra Club

Seize The Day; Save The Bay!

September 21, 2015

Save The Day

On September 26, there will be a rally in Coos Bay from Noon to 6:00 PM to help raise public awareness of the dangers posed by the proposed Jordon Cove LNG project. The family-friendly event is called “Seize the Day; Save the Bay!” and will highlight the clean environment of the bay and the damage to the environment that will occur if this massive fossil fuel project is approved.

Because of all of the hype around job creation and natural gas being a “bridge fuel to a clean energy future” it is critically important to bring public awareness to the reality of LNG export terminals.

The “Seize the Day; Save the Bay!” rally will give you a chance to let our elected officials know that this project and the similar one near Astoria are simply unacceptable and that the people of Oregon say:

  • NO to these morally bankrupt Canadian energy companies intent on making money while pushing Earth further towards ecological collapse
  • NO to taking both private and public property for corporate gain with no public benefit foreign corporations
  • NO to environmental destruction of our scenic coastal ecologies and fisheries
  • NO to living in a high risk blast zone
  • NO to sacrificing our timber resources

For an excellent overview of the proposed Jordan Cove Project go here.

Come on out and help build a better future for future generations of Oregonians.

Information on the Statewide No LNG Coalition which planned this event can be found here.

If you have any questions, please contact the Oregon Sierra Club’s Beyond Gas and Oil Team’s Co-Chair, Gregory Monahan, at

We are about to get FERC’d

September 15, 2015

The Federal Government Prepares to Bless a Catastrophic LNG Project –
Running from Canada to the Columbia

by Ted Gleichman

We are about to get FERC’d in Northwest Oregon and Western Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the agency responsible for awarding the key Federal permission for major fossil-fuels energy infrastructure projects. FERC is now preparing to approve the projects proposed by a hedge fund / conglomerate subsidiary named Oregon LNG: more than $6 billion of huge new natural gas pipelines feeding into a planned massive industrial plant to liquefy this gas for export to Asia.

LNG tanker

The Oregon LNG (OLNG) project set includes:

  • a pipeline from Canada all the way through Washington State to Woodland, where it would tunnel under the Columbia River for a mile into Columbia County, Oregon;
  • a linked pipeline running through Columbia and Clatsop counties to Warrenton, on Young’s Bay, adjacent to Astoria; and
  • a gigantic liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal on the Skipanon River peninsula in Warrenton, protruding into the Columbia River, with docking and LNG transfer facilities for tankers 20 stories tall, with the LNG stored in 19-story tall tanks.

FERC is holding legally-required hearings in Washington and Oregon, but let’s be clear: FERC is 100% funded by the industry, and they have never rejected a major fossil fuels infrastructure project. For protecting the interests of the people of Oregon, the United States, and the world, FERC is a sham, a fraud, and a rubber stamp for an industry rapidly destroying a livable planet.

So why should you consider coming to FERC hearings in Astoria on Monday, September 21, and in Vernonia on Tuesday, September 22? There are three reasons:

  • First and most importantly, we are building a mass movement of opposition, and we need to get to know each other and learn how to work together. If you can come to a hearing, wear red and sign in not just with FERC but also with the Statewide Anti-LNG Coalition organizing team.
  • Second, it is imperative that we show the media, the general public, and Oregon elected officials and agency staff who are watching these hearings closely, that we will not accept these dangerous, destructive projects. We can’t stop them through FERC, but we can through the State of Oregon if we build enough pressure.
  • Finally, it is also important to build a record of opposition, with citizens from all walks of life standing up to the Federal government to object – to use our First Amendment rights to petition for redress of grievances.

Here are a few key talking points you can use for the paltry three minutes FERC allows for members of the public to speak. Feel free to think of your three minutes of oral testimony as an executive summary and then turn in longer written testimony at the hearing, or mail it in afterwards.

The Truth about Fracked Gas and LNG exports:

  • Methane is a major source of global warming and climate disruption; LNG exports and fracked gas production are NOT “climate solutions.”
    – Methane, CH4, is the first hydrocarbon and the smallest hydrocarbon molecule. This miniscule molecule carries with it 86 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide over a 20-year period.
    – Because it is so small, it leaks throughout the supply chain: at the wellhead, in transmission and distribution pipelines, at compressor stations and processing plants, during liquefaction, during ocean going transit, in re-gasification in a foreign port, in overseas distribution, and in end-use facilities.
    – Atmospheric methane levels, like atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, are rising catastrophically, and we must reduce its extraction and use as quickly as possible.
  • Exporting LNG will increase natural gas costs for US households, businesses, and manufacturers, hurting our fragile economy.
    – Supply and demand is a straightforward concept: if major quantities of a commodity are removed from a marketplace and shipped overseas, domestic prices will go up. Natural gas is the most versatile fossil fuel and holds the most complex role in our economy of any fossil fuel.
    – Although we must quickly reduce and eventually eliminate its use for all but perhaps a few specialized manufacturing needs, for now the major urgent requirement is to protect it from corporate export exploitation and keep it in the ground.
  • Corporate power to take property rights with eminent domain and anti-democracy corporate trade powers like the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership abuse the public trust.
    – Eminent domain was designed as a Constitutional provision by our nation’s founders to provide for fair compensation to landowners losing land for the public good. No public good has been demonstrated. For a multinational corporation to take family farms, woodlands, and homes as well as public forests for private profit through foreign export is a gross violation of the public interest.
    – And corporate trade deals that remove the right of the public to be represented by our governmental agencies and U.S. courts are a clear assault on sovereignty and basic American rights.
  • Toxic fracking irreversibly damages community water and land.
    – Industry-secret toxic fracking fluids permanently pollute underground formations with cracks and channels that often link to aquifers and eventually to the surface. Fracking lubricates stressed rock formations and has been proven to cause earthquakes.
    – The mixed gaseous hydrocarbons coming from the fracking wells are mostly methane, but also include butane, propane, ethanes, carbon dioxide, radon, mercury, and other toxins. Especially dangerous for land pollution is “produced water”: permanently polluted water that comes to the surface with the wellhead gases, and then must be disposed of somehow.
    – Fracking zones throughout the U.S. are already permanently damaged from this toxic brew.
  • Siting explosive, toxic facilities on the Oregon coast, guaranteed to suffer the most catastrophic earthquake and tsunami in US history, is outrageous and must not be allowed.
    – The earthquake from the Cascadia Subduction Zone that will hit Warrenton-Astoria will be a Magnitude 9 and generate a tsunami that could be 10 stories tall or more. It has a one-third chance of hitting within the 50-year lifespan of the OLNG plant.
    – No explosive tanker, LNG storage tank, or pipeline can be guaranteed to withstand such force. It will be the mirror image of the Japanese Tohoku-Fukushima earthquake and tsunami of 2011. Check out what the State of Oregon says about seismic hazards here.
  • Communities all along pipelines suffer air and water pollution and risk constant danger from explosive pipeline failures.
    – Pipelines and LNG processing plants always leak, sooner or later, and are at constant risk of catastrophic leaks and explosive failure. In the forest zones of Columbia and Clatsop counties, a pipeline rupture during fire season would create a massive conflagration.
    – When the earthquake hits, the 40-foot sections of the pipeline will rupture at every joint, and then the metal edges will rub and spark for several minutes. This would create a 90-mile line of wildfire across Northwest Oregon at a time when the First Responders are already completely overwhelmed.
    – The reverse is also a serious risk: a natural wildfire can heat and fracture a gas pipeline, even under a clearcut, burning through root systems or heating from above with a flaming tree falling across the pipeline path.
    – Running an explosive pipeline through forests experiencing severe, larger, and more frequent wildfires is a formula for disaster.
  • Jobs that damage our climate are not “good jobs”; we need clean, sustainable renewable energy and earthquake/tsunami protection jobs.
    – We need to rebuild our coastal and inland infrastructure to provide resilience against the coming earthquake, and we need an urgent complete transition to a green energy economy, where renewables, efficiency, and conservation eliminate the CO2 pollution that is rapidly overheating our oceans and atmosphere.
    – Genuine good jobs can be created and funded here and now! It’s up to us to build the political will for new ways to build economic health.

If you cannot attend a hearing and want to submit written testimony, or if you want to expand on your hearing testimony, the FERC deadline to accept additional information and comments is October 6. You can see instructions for submitting comments at

The Bottom Line:

The Oregon LNG plans are essentially a criminal enterprise, aiming at locking in a long-term export plan for fracked gas that would constitute double the amount used now by all the households, businesses, and manufacturers in Oregon. Our state, our nation, and our planet cannot withstand this assault. They must be stopped, and we would be honored to have your help. Thank you!


Ted Gleichman is Co-chair of Oregon Sierra Club Beyond Gas & Oil Team and a member of the National Strategy Team for Sierra Club’s Stop Dirty Fuels Initiative. You can reach Ted at or 503-781-2498.

Stand up for Oregon. No Pipelines. No LNG. Call-in Days of Action! Wednesday August 12th and August 26th (All Day)

August 7, 2015

People from all over the state are standing up to two proposed fracked gas export terminal and pipeline proposals in Oregon and we need you to join us!No LNG Logo

Last week, The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a draft environmental review for the Oregon LNG terminal and pipeline near Astoria Oregon. The Environmental Impact Statement for Oregon LNG didn’t address the impacts to public health and safety, endangered salmon, or the economy. With FERC also planning to issue their Final Impact Statement for Jordan Cove here in Southern Oregon on September 30th, we need our state officials to stand up for Oregon NOW!

Salem LNG Rally-May 26 2015

On Wednesday, August 12th or August 26th please join us for statewide call-in days to flood the offices of  Gov. Brown and our U.S. Senators Merkley and Wyden asking them to stand up for Oregon! Please take 10 minutes on August 12th or August 26th to call and ask Gov. Brown officials to deny key state permits for these projects and prepare to defend Oregon’s interests in court if FERC approves these projects! We also are looking to our federal senators to stand up for Oregon’s right to deny LNG terminals.

Find all the details, phone numbers and talking points for the call-in by clicking here: Call in Day Instructions and Talking Points. It also important that we keep track of how many calls we are making and the impact they have. After you make your calls please take a moment to fill out the tracking form HERE to record the results of your call.

Please spread the word!

______________________________________________________________________________ Support Hike the Pipe! (August 22- September 27)

This summer, a group of Oregonians will hike through 232 miles of beautiful and scenic southwestern Oregon to protest the Jordan Cove pipeline and export terminal. Hike the Pipe is a community action that will draw attention to the communities and ecosystems threatened by the Pacific Connector Pipeline. We need community support to make this project happen! Please learn more about Hike the Pipe by watching the video below and donate to the project today!

Some things to know about the Clean Power Plan

August 5, 2015

Its here!

Yesterday President Obama and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy revealed the Clean Power Plan. As McCarthy put it, it was “an incredibly wicked cool moment.” But what does it mean?

In short, the plan aims to reduce carbon pollution nation wide by 32% by 2030 by putting limits on how much carbon can be put into the atmosphere by power plants. This is the first time such limits have ever been set, truly a “wicked cool moment.” But I’m sure you want more than the short of it.

To help answer the question I’ve compiled information from a few great articles and sources (all at the bottom) from the internet for you. If you have others you like feel free to post in the comments or tweet at us, @ORsierraclub:

The Plan will cut carbon pollution that is fueling Climate Change:McCarthyvideostill

Power Plants are the largest emitters of carbon pollution in the United States. They total about one third of all the emissions we generate. When fully implemented in 2030 the Clean Power Plan will reduce our carbon pollution by 870 million tons. That’s 166 million cars or 70% of our passenger vehicles off the road.

It will protect6a00d83451b96069e201a3fd38a3db970b our health:

By 2030, each year there will be 3600 fewer premature deaths, 90,000 asthma attacks, 1700 heart attacks, and 300,000 missed days of school and work. That’s because when we limit carbon emissions we are also limiting 318,000 tons of sulfur dioxide and 282,000 tons of nitrogen dioxide. Both gases contribute to soot and smog that make people sick.


It will help protect low income communities and communities of color:

The impacts of burning dirty fuels are disproportionately felt by low income communities and communities of color. Van Jones put it best in his CNN piece about the Plan: “The clean power plan will massively help minorities and low-income Americans. After all, one in six black kids and one in nine Latino children has asthma. Seventy-eight percent of African-Americans live within 30 miles of a dirty, polluting coal plant. African-Americans are also more likely to live in coastal areas and die during heat waves.” You should read his entire blog linked in the notes.

It will save us money on our utility bills:

When you total up the health and climate related benefits of the Clean Power Plan we’re looking at upwards of $45 billion of savings when fully implemented. That’s a lot of money that could be going to a lot of other great causes and issues. Bottom line, by 2030 the average American household can expect save around $7 a month on their utility bills. That’s not chump change.

It puts our state in the driver’s seat:

The Clean Power Plan sets carbon pollution standards for power plants across the country, but sets individual state goals based on each state’s current energy mix and what unique opportunities exist in each state. To make is easy the EPA has even created a model rule that states can adopt that guarantees their compliance with the Plan. If they don’t like that plan they can cut carbon pollution anyway they want as long as they meet the goals. This mean big opportunities to be leaders for states like Oregon.

We’ve got a good start to build from in Oregon:

Its Oregon’s time shine. We are already doing some things to move the energy sector to a fossil fuel free future and are on our way to meeting our goals in the Clean Power Plan, but there is a great deal more that needs to be done.

Renewable energy production in Oregon has grown 159% since 2008 and Oregon has a renewable portfolio standard that require utilities to generate 25% of their electricity with renewable sources by 2025. Our only coal fired power plant is already scheduled to go offline. Many Oregon cities and counties have climate plans of their own. Our Low Carbon Fuel Standard will reduce carbon pollution from our transportation sector.

More to do:beyond-coal-campaign-sierra-club-logo-large

Did you know that Oregon already has goals to reduce our carbon pollution 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. Unfortunately those are just goals and aren’t enforceable in any sector. We could challenge the nation and lead by making these goals rules rather than aspirations. Leading this way will spur clean energy and efficiency development and create a center for innovation here in Oregon and the economic benefits that come with it.

Utilities are also looking to replace their coal fired energy production with natural gas fired power plants instead of clean renewable energy. We must move away from fossil fuels, not toward them. Gas is not clean and added are the impacts of fracking and methane releases from wells. Natural gas is not a long term solution. We need our utilities to be planning for a fossil fuel free future.

Multinational corporations are also hoping that Oregon and the Pacific Northwest will be a tap for dirty fuels on the global market. We need our elected officials and state agencies to stand up and say “no way.”  We have to decide if we want to talk about climate leadership or really show what that leadership looks like. We can’t talk about reducing our own carbon pollution while allowing big oil, gas, and coal to ship their dirty fuels around the globe for others to burn.

It is equally important that as we begin to comply with the Clean Power Plan and take further climate action that our changes are not burdens to low income communities or communities of color. These communities disproportionately  are impacted by the negative consequences of our current energy system, both from climate change and pollution. Our Climate Action Plan should serve as a means to lessen those impacts on those most in need of relief, not add to them. In addition the benefits of clean energy should be shared equally and not go to further these inequalities and benefit some more than others.

I fully applaud the President and Administrator McCarthy for their leadership and for producing the Clean Power Plan. I also call on our elected officials to not rest here, to continue to lead and push for further carbon reductions and an end to the fossil fuel era. I also call on you to make sure elected officials are accountable for their actions or lack of action when it comes to climate. As the President said yesterday in his announcement “If we don’t do it nobody will.”


EPA Blog post: Six things every American Should Know about the Clean Power Plan

Oregonian: Oregon Already on a path to meet Obama’s new clean power goals

CNN: Busted: Three Myths About Obama’s Climate Plan by Van Jones

EPA: Clean Power Plan State Specific Fact Sheets

Whitehouse: What the Clean Power Plan Means for America

Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club’s Statement on the Clean Power Plan