Rally for the Elliott State Forest

December 2, 2016

This is it! The Oregon Department of State Lands has received a bid that would see the Elliott State Forest sold to a private timber company and heavily logged. Our elected leaders, including Governor Kate Brown, Treasurer Ted Wheeler, and Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins have the opportunity to stop the privatization process and Save the Elliott.

Join public lands advocates from across Oregon for a rally before the State Land Board Meeting where our leaders could decide protect this public treasure. Plan to stick around and attend the meeting – sign up to testify to make sure your voice is heard!

CARPOOL INFORMATION:

From Eugene you can meet the Many Rivers Group at 7:45 near the bike bridge behind the Valley River Center (293 Valley River Center).

From Portland you can meet at 7:45 at Holladay City Park (NE 11th Ave). RSVP to staylor@audubonportland.org or go here: https://www.groupcarpool.com/t/v5hoju.

If you’d like to carpool from Coos Bay area please add yourself to this rideshare board: https://www.groupcarpool.com/t/6ua89y, or email savetheelliott@gmail.com.

 

More carpool info coming soon.

Wear green. Bring banners and signs. Save the Elliott!

rally


Rally for wild salmon!

November 29, 2016

free-the-snake

We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild salmon in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia and Snake Rivers, once the greatest salmon rivers in the world. We can do this by removing four outdated and expensive dams on the lower Snake River. But we need your help.

Please RSVP to attend rallies and public meetings in The Dalles, Portland, and Astoria! Details below.

For nearly 20 years, in spite of multiple court rulings that have found their actions illegal, the federal agencies that own these salmon-killing dams have refused to fully evaluate removing them. That changed last May when a federal court judge directly ordered the agencies to develop a plan for dam operations that will restore our wild salmon — and directed them to specifically consider dam removal.

Now the agencies are seeking the public’s input on what they should do. For years scientists have said that removing the four deadly dams on the lower Snake is the single biggest step we can take to restore wild salmon to the river basin. Come out to a rally and public meeting in The Dalles, Portland, and Astoria.salmon

The time is now to remove the four outdated, low-value, deadbeat dams on the lower Snake River. If we free the Snake, we can save the salmon and bring about the biggest river restoration in history.

Rallies for Wild Salmon

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WHAT:   The Dalles Rally for Wild Salmon and to “Free the Snake!”
WHEN:     Tuesday, December 6, 2016 staring at 4 pm
WHERE:  Columbia Gorge Discovery Ctr., Downstairs Classroom
5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, OR 97058
(Use “West Side” door, follow signs for “Service Entrance”)
MAP:        https://goo.gl/maps/reimivTB6572
WHAT:     Salmon Reception and Speakers – Meet old and new friends. Socialize with river people.  Hear from scientists, advocates and the Native perspective.
4:00PM – Sunset welcome ceremony overlooking the Columbia River
5:00PM – Speakers & new short video by Nimiipuu – Protecting the Environment
6:00PM – Columbia River salmon and other light fare
7:30PM – Depart for pub after-meeting. Location TBD
Feds’ public meeting will be upstairs. Open until 7 pm.

WHAT:     Portland Rally for Wild Salmon and to “Free the Snake!”
WHEN:    Wednesday, December 7, 2016 starting at 4 pm
WHERE:  The Mezzanine in Spirit of 77
(directly across the street from the Convention Center)
500 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Portland, OR 97232
MAP:         https://goo.gl/maps/NwAqpg6hKc42
WHAT:     We’ll gather for a rally and speakers at 4 pm, then go together to the feds’ Public Meeting across the street. Afterward, we’ll return to the Spirit of 77 to celebrate!

WHAT:    Astoria Rally for Wild Salmon and to “Free the Snake!”
WHEN: Thursday, December 15th, 2016 – Public Hearings: From 4 pm to 7 pm. Salmon advocates will gather beforehand at 3:30 pm
WHERE: The Loft at the Red Building, Basin St., Astoria, OR.  Salmon advocates will gather at the Bridgewater Bistro in the Red Building at 3:30 pm for a rally.
WHY: To meet up with fellow salmon and river advocates and show strong support for healthy rivers and salmon. Members of the public concerned about wild salmon restoration are encouraged to attend. Please share with your friends and family and encourage others to come. Just like wild salmon – more is better!
Read the rest of this entry »


Restore Wild Salmon – Remove the Lower Snake River Dams!

November 15, 2016

free-the-snake

We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to restore wild salmon in the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia and Snake Rivers, once the greatest salmon rivers in the world. We can do this by removing four outdated and expensive dams on the lower Snake River. But we need your help.

Please attend rallies and public meetings in The Dalles, Portland, and Astoria! Details below.

For nearly 20 years, in spite of multiple court rulings that have found their actions illegal, the federal agencies that own these salmon-killing dams have refused to fully evaluate removing them. That changed last May when a federal court judge directly ordered the agencies to develop a plan for dam operations that will restore our wild salmon — and directed them to specifically consider dam removal.

Now the agencies are seeking the public’s input on what they should do. For years scientists have said that removing the four deadly dams on the lower Snake is the single biggest step we can take to restore wild salmon to the river basin. Come out to a rally and public meeting in The Dalles, Portland, and Astoria.salmon

The time is now to remove the four outdated, low-value, deadbeat dams on the lower Snake River. If we free the Snake, we can save the salmon and bring about the biggest river restoration in history.

Rallies for Wild Salmon

WHAT:   The Dalles Rally for Wild Salmon and to “Free the Snake!”
WHEN:     Tuesday, December 6, 2016 staring at 4 pm
WHERE:  Columbia Gorge Discovery Ctr., Downstairs Classroom
5000 Discovery Drive
The Dalles, OR 97058
(Use “West Side” door, follow signs for “Service Entrance”)
MAP:        https://goo.gl/maps/reimivTB6572
WHAT:     Salmon Reception and Speakers – Meet old and new friends. Socialize with river people.  Hear from scientists, advocates and the Native perspective.
4:00PM – Sunset welcome ceremony overlooking the Columbia River
5:00PM – Speakers & new short video by Nimiipuu – Protecting the Environment
6:00PM – Columbia River salmon and other light fare
7:30PM – Depart for pub after-meeting. Location TBD
Feds’ public meeting will be upstairs. Open until 7 pm.

WHAT:     Portland Rally for Wild Salmon and to “Free the Snake!”
WHEN:    Wednesday, December 7, 2016 starting at 4 pm
WHERE:  The Mezzanine in Spirit of 77
(directly across the street from the Convention Center)
500 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd
Portland, OR 97232
MAP:         https://goo.gl/maps/NwAqpg6hKc42
WHAT:     We’ll gather for a rally and speakers at 4 pm, then go together to the feds’ Public Meeting across the street. Afterward, we’ll return to the Spirit of 77 to celebrate!

WHAT:    Astoria Rally for Wild Salmon and to “Free the Snake!”
WHEN:    Thursday, December 8, 2016; details forthcoming!
WHERE:    TBD
WHAT:     TBD


Oregon Sierra Club August Events

August 7, 2016
August 17th: Time To Choose – Portland

Join NAACP Portland Chapter and Oregon Sierra Club, Columbia Network for a special screening of Time To Choose and featuring a special keynote address by social justice activist, leader, and NAACP Portland Chapter President Jo Ann Hardesty. Climate change is the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced – and it is also our greatest opportunity. We have the solutions we need, but we are in a race against the clock to implement a just transition in time. Narrated by award-winning actor Oscar Isaac and directed by Academy Award®-Winning documentary filmmaker Charles Ferguson, Time To Choose captures the urgency and innovation of this critical moment and leaves audiences understanding not only what is wrong, but what can to be done to fix this global threat

Wednesday, August 17th, 6:30 pm
OMSI Empirical Theater, 1945 SE Water Ave, Portland
Tickets here!
Time to Choose

August 17th: Our Fish & Our Forests – Astoria

Fish and forests command significant attention in Oregon’s vibrant dialogue. Both resources have a deep history of contributing to our culture, economy, and ecology. This talk is aimed at illuminating how fish – especially salmon and steelhead – and forest interact. How do our coastal forested watersheds impact salmonid health? How, in turn, do fish play a role in forest ecosystems? And, what are the implications of the way we manage these resources?

Wednesday, August 17th, 6:30 – 7:30
Towler Hall Room 310, Clatsop Community College, Astoria
Details here!
Trask River 2

August 20th: Rock Against the TPP – Portland

The TPP poses many threats to our climate and for that reason the Sierra Club is determined to stop the TPP from coming up for a vote in Congress this fall. There are only a handful of Democrats throughout the entire country that might vote for the TPP during the Lame Duck session and several of them are from Oregon! This means we have a major opportunity (and responsibility) to pressure our Rep’s and stop the TPP from coming to a vote.

Come show your support for trade justice!

Saturday, August 20th, 5:00 pm
Director Park, 815 SW Park Avenue, Portland
Free tickets here!
Landscape TPP

August 26th: Lummi Totem Pole Ceremony- Vancouver, WA

The Lummi Nation House of Tears Carvers will showcase their latest totem pole carved in solidary with communities throughout the region fighting against fossil fuel export terminals. Earlier this spring, the Lummi Nation succeeded in blocking the construction of the Gateway Pacific coal export terminal proposed at Cherry Point, Washington. The totem pole journey is intended to build relationships and solidarity between tribes and communities pushing back against the recent flood of fossil fuel export proposals throughout the region.

The totem pole visits Longview just one month before the Army Corps of Engineers is slated to release their Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the Millennium Bulk Terminals coal export proposal.

WHO: Lummi Nation House of Tears Carvers, Cowlitz County faith leaders & you! 
WHAT: A presentation of the totem pole and spiritual blessing of the totem pole and the journey. 
WHEN: Friday, August 26th, 2016 10:30-Noon, lunch to follow 
WHERE: Longview United Methodist Church, 2851 30th Ave, Longview, WA 98632

Lunch contributions: Dessert – Longview Presbyterian; Salads – St. Stephens Episcopal; Bread and beverages – Longview Methodist.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

https://totempolejourney.com/
https://www.facebook.com/events/302048710136261/ 
Totem

August 26th-28th: Waldo Lake Campout

The Oregon Sierra Club Eastside Forest Committee has initiated a campaign to provide greater protection for the forested areas east of Waldo Lake, a beautiful region 35 miles southwest of Bend containing abundant old growth and roadless areas. Currently it is unprotected beyond its federal forest status. For more information on what we’re proposing, look at our Keep Waldo Wild web page. This weekend car campout is designed to introduce you Waldo Lake’s environs and treat you to its plentiful attractions. We hope you’ll become as excited about preserving the area east and south of Waldo Lake as we are!

The 2016 Waldo Weekend Campout will be held August 26-28, Friday-Sunday, at the Shadow Bay Campground on the southern end of the lake. Group Site B, Sites 25 thru 43, is reserved for Friday and Saturday nights and will accommodate 60 to 120 people.

Additional details here!
Register here!
Waldo

Join us in Salem on May 23 to speak out for the Owyhee!

May 18, 2016

The Owyhee needs you NOW.

South Fork Owyhee (photo credit: Chad Case)

South Fork Owyhee (photo credit: Chad Case)

Will you join us in Salem on Monday, May 23, to ensure our Oregon lawmakers know Oregonians want the Owyhee Canyonlands protected?

The House Rural Communities, Land Use, and Water Committee will meet to discuss permanent protection for the Owyhee. A group opposing protection will be there in force, so it’s critical that supporters like you show our leaders how much you care about protecting the Owyhee.

We’ll meet at Oregon Capitol Building’s main entrance (900 Court St NE, Salem, OR 97301) at 8 a.m. on Monday, May 23. See map.

Schedule
8 a.m. Arrive at Capitol
8:30 a.m. Committee session starts
Noon: Owyhee Rally!
1:30 p.m. Grab a slice of pizza and head for the bus or your car to travel home!

Getting There
Drive yourself: Arrive at Capitol Building’s main entrance (900 Court St NE, Salem, OR 97301) at 8 a.m. Get parking information here.

Get on the bus: We’ll have coffee and pastries for early risers!

 

  • Bend Bus: Departs Oregon Natural Desert Association’s office (50 SW Bond St. Ste #4, Bend, OR 97702) at 5 a.m. Monday. Returns by 4:30 p.m.

 

What to bring
Please wear bright blue to show you’re an Oregonian who is #WildForTheOwyhee! We’ll have buttons and posters for everyone. Birder? Kayaker? Backpacker? Bring the gear you love to use in the Owyhee. And bring family and friends!

RSVP!
Let us know you can make it AND if you’ll be hopping on the Portland or Bend bus. RSVP here by noon on May 20.

Thank you for being a strong voice for the wildlife, lands and waters of the Owyhee. Together, we’ll ensure this Oregon treasure is protected, forever!

P.S. Can’t make it? Please send an email telling the House Committee that you love the Owyhee and want to see it protected, now! Send your note to hrcluw.exhibits@state.or.us


Earth Day: Past and Present

April 19, 2016

In recent years, Earth Day has come to be associated with buying green. Earth Day is coming up; buy compostable bamboo plates for your next picnic. Earth Day is coming up; offset your airline miles by donating to rain-forest preservation. Earth Day is coming up; buy yourself a pair of athletic pants made from recycled plastic bottles.

While mindful purchases do make a difference, the greater meaning of Earth Day is often drowned in a puddle of consumerism. Shouldn’t Earth Day be about activism? When it first began, Earth Day was a revolution, one intended to question our values. It wasn’t about buying things; it was about demanding change.

Proxy Falls Three Sisters Wilderness, Oregon, USA

Proxy Falls
Three Sisters Wilderness,
Oregon, USA

It’s been 46 years since the first Earth Day. April 22nd, 1970 was a day of nationwide rallies, protests, demonstrations, and environmental activism. College students, environmental organizations—including the Sierra Club—and political groups joined together to build awareness around the many environmental ills they had witnessed; pollution, sewage dumping, toxic waste, oil spills, and declining wilderness.

The man behind Earth Day was Wisconsin senator Gaylord Nelson. The 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, California inspired him to host a national teach-in on the environment—which ended up becoming the extensive mass of activism known as Earth Day. He recruited Congressman Pete McCloskey and Harvard graduate student Denis Hayes—an activist against the Vietnam War—and a staff of 85 people to help him plan events all over the country. Their work paid off; the public outcry of 20 million people and an influx of awareness led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act, which continue to uphold the environmental values of those original protestors.

As we all know, Earth Day didn’t stop there. It became an annual event, serving as a celebration of the Earth’s beauty, a kindling of hope for a greener future, as well as a tool for building movements and amassing support for the environment.

Rather than remaining an American holiday, Earth Day went on to become globally recognized. Thanks again to organization by Denis Hayes, 141 countries participated in Earthy Day 1990. Efforts were focused on promoting recycling and halting rainforest destruction. Restoration, tree planting, and community works caught on as new ways take action. Earth Day became a chance for different cultures to band together, and to unite over something we all care about—the well-being of our shared planet.

In the new millennium, much of the focus has been on climate change. Protestors have demanded swift action, a transition to

Getting kids outside is hugely important to public health.

clean energy, and an end to fossil fuel use. Both 2000 and 2010 were big years for Earth Day. The international approach was upheld and broadened to over 180 countries. Hayes has continued to organize awareness events worldwide, including a campaign to plant over 1 billion trees. With another milestone year coming up in 2020, more big events are in the works.

Earth Day 2016 may not be a milestone by number, but it will surely be remembered for years to come. On April 22nd, China and the U.S. will band together to sign the Paris Climate Agreement. By taking early initiative in signing the agreement, both countries hope to set a precedent for the remaining 55 countries who need to sign on. With climate change accelerating, this action is crucial. Public support, as well as a demand for further solutions to climate change, will play an integral part in developing a clean energy future.1384381_10151988737616213_1384143042826289730_n

The history of Earth Day is proof of its power—Earth Day allows us to grab the world’s attention. It gives us a stage on which to demand change. It should not be an opportunity to ease our guilt. It should not leave us saying, we ate locally today; we bought organic socks, so we’ve paid our penance for the year. We should be making environmentally friendly choices each and every day, with Earth Day serving as a magnifying glass and a microphone; it should be the spurring point of action, the rapids before the waterfall, the point of coalescence for all those who care. Earth Day is a powerful tool; let’s use it.

You can help put the activism back in Earth Day (and every day) by getting involved in your community or volunteering with local environmental groups, like the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club.


Seize The Day; Save The Bay!

September 21, 2015

Save The Day

On September 26, there will be a rally in Coos Bay from Noon to 6:00 PM to help raise public awareness of the dangers posed by the proposed Jordon Cove LNG project. The family-friendly event is called “Seize the Day; Save the Bay!” and will highlight the clean environment of the bay and the damage to the environment that will occur if this massive fossil fuel project is approved.

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Because of all of the hype around job creation and natural gas being a “bridge fuel to a clean energy future” it is critically important to bring public awareness to the reality of LNG export terminals.

The “Seize the Day; Save the Bay!” rally will give you a chance to let our elected officials know that this project and the similar one near Astoria are simply unacceptable and that the people of Oregon say:

  • NO to these morally bankrupt Canadian energy companies intent on making money while pushing Earth further towards ecological collapse
  • NO to taking both private and public property for corporate gain with no public benefit foreign corporations
  • NO to environmental destruction of our scenic coastal ecologies and fisheries
  • NO to living in a high risk blast zone
  • NO to sacrificing our timber resources

For an excellent overview of the proposed Jordan Cove Project go here.

Come on out and help build a better future for future generations of Oregonians.

Information on the Statewide No LNG Coalition which planned this event can be found here.

If you have any questions, please contact the Oregon Sierra Club’s Beyond Gas and Oil Team’s Co-Chair, Gregory Monahan, at gpmonahan3@gmail.com.