Kitzhaber Takes Strong Stand on Coal Exports!

April 27, 2012

Oregonians from across the state rally against coal exports at the State Land Board meeting in Salem on April 9, 2012. Photo by Gregory Sotir

This week, Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber expressed ‘grave concerns,’ over the public health, economic and environmental impacts of proposed coal exports through Oregon and Washington in a speech before renewable energy advocates and business leaders.

The Governor further outlined major concerns over the issue in a detailed letter to the Army Corps of Engineers, Interior Department and Bureau of Land Management requesting a comprehensive federal review of impacts from proposals to mine and ship tens of millions of tons of coal through Oregon en route to Asia.

The Sierra Club issued the following statement:

“We applaud Governor Kitzhaber for calling on federal agencies to thoroughly assess the dangerous risks associated with dirty coal exports,” said Laura Stevens, local organizer for Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign. She added, “Oregonians from around the state have raised serious concerns about the health, safety, and economic consequences of coal exports for their communities. The Governor has heard them loud and clear and is echoing their call for a comprehensive review.”

The letter from the Governor comes in the midst of elevated public interest and mounting opposition to dirty coal export plans proposed for the region, including strong letters to the Army Corps of Engineers from the federal Environmental Protection Agency and Washington Department of Natural Resources.

“The Governor is raising concerns at a critical time. Out-of-state coal companies are hoping to fast-track federal and state permitting at the Port of Morrow and other locations to get approval for coal export before any comprehensive review of the environmental, health, and economic impacts have been considered,” said Ivan Maluski, Conservation Director for the Sierra Club’s Oregon Chapter. “The Governor has set a strong direction that we hope leads to a rigorous and comprehensive review of all of the harmful impacts of coal export before any necessary federal or state permits are issued.”

Oregonians Fight to Block Coal Exports

April 13, 2012

Oregonians from across the state rally against coal exports at a State Land Board meeting in Salem, April 9 2012. Photo by Gregory Sotir

Oregon’s voice against coal exports is getting louder!  On the morning of April 9 in Salem, over 100 Oregonians from all corners of the state rallied outside the Oregon State Lands Board meeting to send a message to Governor Kitzhaber and other state decision-makers to reject dirty coal exports.  The event was a huge success, covered by regional and local television, radio and print media, and reflecting the geographic diversity of the opposition to coal export from Coos Bay to the Columbia Gorge, and communities in between.

Coal export is a statewide and regional issue that demands leadership from Oregon’s key decision-makers. Currently, the Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) is considering issuing a permit for a proposed coal export dock at the Port of Morrow on the Columbia River. The US Army Corps of Engineers is taking public comment on the same proposal until May 5 (click here to comment).

The press conference highlighted voices from several areas of Oregon that would be affected, providing different perspectives on the impacts dirty coal trains and barges would have on Oregonians’ health, environment, and quality of life.  People gathered from the Portland area, Gorge communities, Eugene, Salem, and Southern Oregon cities.  The rally featured the “coal monster” costume, colorful signs highlighting where they were from and their perspective as a parent, health professional, business owner, etc.  The gathering also featured over 7,000 comments from around the state calling for Governor Kitzhaber and Director of the Department of State Lands (DSL) Louise Solliday to reject coal exports.

Speakers at the rally in Salem included David Petrie, Coos Tribal member and director of Coos Waterkeeper in Coos Bay, the site of proposed coal terminal enshrouded in secrecy;  Peter Cornelison from Friends of the Columbia Gorge in Hood River, which would impacted by proposals to ship coal by rail and barge to ports further downstream; Duncan MacKenzie, an industrial designer from Rainier, a town which would be bisected by coal train traffic;  and Andy Harris, a medical doctor representing Physicians for Social Responsibility.

The strong showing in Salem from anti-coal export activists and affected community members from across the state is just the beginning of a growing statewide voice opposed to coal exports in Oregon.

Coos Bay Coal Export Battle Heats Up

March 9, 2012

Proposals to export coal from Oregon to China will increase global warming pollution, coal related health problems, and contribute to harmful mercury build up in Oregon's rivers.

In June 2011, seeking to learn more about the public health and environmental impacts associated with coal export plans, the Sierra Club filed a simple request to the Port of Coos Bay under the Oregon Public Records Act to learn more about their plans to develop a major coal export terminal. Media reports had referenced confidential agreements the Port was involved in with unnamed coal companies, but little information was publicly available.

Because the Sierra Club would not profit from the information and would instead use it to educate the public, we requested a waiver of fees. In response, the Port of Coos Bay went on the attack. They demanded that we supply them with unnecessary and invasive information about Sierra Club board members and claimed it would cost almost $10 per page to view over 2000 pages of public documents they had in their possession. Of the approximately $20,000 they sought, nearly $17,000 of it was for attorney’s fees alone, billed at $200 per hour.

As it became clear that the Port was attempting to block access to the public records by charging unreasonable fees, we made an appeal to the Coos County District Attorney. After considering the facts, the District Attorney agreed that charging nearly $17,000 in attorneys fees was ‘unreasonable.’ In a late February decision, the District Attorney wrote eloquently, “the Public Records Law as a whole embodies a strong policy in favor of the public’s right to inspect public records. If an agency places a high cost on the public in order for the public to obtain access to the records, the rights of the public to have access will be hindered, chilled or even denied.” Even the Coos Bay World newspaper, which to date has shown little sympathy for the Sierra Club’s efforts to block coal export, editorialized in our favor in the public records case.

Unfortunately, the Port of Coos Bay is now appealing the District Attorney’s decision to circuit court. In the meantime, they have charged another organization, Eugene based Beyond Toxics, $22,000 for public records related to hauling coal by train through Eugene and other communities along the route of the Coos Bay Rail Link.

Stay tuned, this battle is just beginning.

Big Coal Eyes Oregon – Oregonians Fight Back

January 19, 2012

Big coal companies are eying Oregon. With coal fired power plants closing across the Northwest and nation due to public demand for cleaner energy, big coal companies want to export the dirty fossil fuel to fast-growing countries in Asia were environmental standards are far lower than in the U.S.

In 2011, the Port of St. Helens along the Columbia River, and the Port of Coos Bay on the southern Oregon Coast, revealed they were in confidential negotiations with unnamed coal companies seeking to export tens of millions of tons of coal to Asia. The Ports have kept the plans secret for months.

But things have been heating up recently. In late December, the Oregon Department of State Lands approved a controversial dredging in north spit of Coos Bay necessary for huge ships that export coal and liquefied natural gas (LNG). On January 18, a coalition of conservation groups and local citizens appealed the decision, arguing that the dredging would cause significant harm to water quality in Coos Bay, and that environmental and public health impacts of exporting LNG and coal were never considered. Read the coalition press release.

Meanwhile, the Port of St. Helens has announced a public meeting to hear from two companies vying to build a coal export terminal on the Columbia River. This is in addition to a coal export terminal proposed for the Washington side of the river in Longview, and another in Bellingham, WA. Read the press release on St. Helens’ coal export plans.

The Sierra Club is fighting multiple coal export plans in the Pacific Northwest as well as plans to export LNG.

Pacificorp Still Hooked on Dirty Coal

November 11, 2011

Massive open pit coal mine in the Powder River Basin along the Wyoming/Montana border. Coal is dirty business.

Pacificorp, Oregon’s second largest utility, is hooked on coal.

The company has plans to continue long-term operation of multiple dirty coal plants to provide energy to its Oregon customers, retrofitting ancient coal facilities despite the cost to consumers and the benefits of switching to clean energy.

In filings before the Oregon Public Utility Commission in its 2011 ‘integrated resource plan,’ the company has made it clear it will keep burning dirty coal long into the future, diverting ratepayer money away from renewable energy and energy efficiency and into costly investments that will extend the life of a number of their coal plants.

Pacificorp’s coal problem is so bad, Oregon regulators are starting to take a hard look at the company’s plans and are poised to make a decision as soon as December 6 that could force the company to seek alternatives to continuing to operate its coal fleet in perpetuity – alternatives like shutting some of the dirtiest plants down and replacing them with renewable energy and investments in energy efficiency.

Unlike Portland General Electric, which has agreed to close its Boardman coal plant in 2020 rather than extend its life by decades, Pacificorp does not operate any coal plants in Oregon. However, it either owns or gets power from burning coal and coal mining in states like Utah, Wyoming, and Montana, supplying Oregonians across the state with dirty energy.

Concerned about Pacificorp’s addiction to dirty coal?

Write a letter to the editor of the Oregonian newspaper:

Here are some key points to make:

1) Pacificorp is doing Oregon customers a disservice by spending ratepayer money burning coal rather than investing in clean alternatives.

2) The company should provide more details on the costs and risks associated with continuing to burn coal, rather than closing old plants and investing money in cleaner alternatives, like generating renewable energy in Oregon.

3) The Oregon Public Utility Commission should reject Pacificorp’s latest plans to invest in dirty coal. Portland General Electric did the right thing by closing their dirty Boardman coal plant, Pacificorp should do the same.

4) Pacificorp should be investing Oregon ratepayer money into projects that create Oregon jobs through energy efficiency and home weatherization, as well as developing new renewable energy sources.

Here’s how to send a letter to the Oregonian:

Letters to the editor, The Oregonian
1320 S.W. Broadway
Portland, Or., 97201

Or e-mail to:

They may also be faxed to (503) 294-4193.

Please limit letters to 150 words. Please include your full address and daytime phone number, for verification only. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Keystone tar sands pipeline on hold!

November 11, 2011

Sierra Club activists protest the Keystone tar sands pipeline at Pioneer Courthouse in Portland in solidarity with thousands outside the White House on November 6.

After months of input from hundreds of thousands of people, and recent protests from the White House to Portland, the Obama administration has decided to reevaluate the environmental review of the dirty Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline. This massive pipeline would bring oil mined from the tar sands underneath the wild boreal forests of Alberta to oil refineries on the Texas Gulf coast, further hooking the US on the dirtiest of fossil fuels.

Send a thank you note to President Obama to taking action to delay the Keystone pipeline!

In Portland on November 6, Sierra Club activists rallied in solidarity with a simultaneous protest against the Keystone pipeline in Washington, DC, which drew some 12,000 people to the White House.

Here’s a recap from one of the organizers of the Portland event, Ted Gleichman, co-chair of the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club’s anti-LNG committee:

Alberta vs. Ontario: What does that mean for the energy and climate future of Oregon?

First, Alberta: This past Sunday, November 6, the Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club was the key grass-roots environmental group working with Occupy Portland in a peaceful and enthusiastic rally and march against the Keystone XL pipeline proposal.

This pipeline would take the dirtiest fossil fuel on the planet, the Alberta Tar Sands, 1,700 miles across the Midwest and the Ogallala Aquifer to Texas Gulf Coast refineries.  Whether it would then be burned in our vehicles or exported to China, it would be the most drastic contribution to irreversible global warming of anything we could do in North America.  A sour deal on every level, this pipeline must be stopped.

Sierra Club volunteers, with staff support, worked with Occupiers to demonstrate West Coast solidarity with “Hands Around the White House,” where 12,000 people demonstrated three and four deep to urge President Obama to stand against further exploitation of the Tar Sands – one year to the day before the 2012 general election.

The Portland event completely encircled the downtown block of the historic Pioneer Courthouse, at the busiest transit intersection in the city.  The 250 demonstrators, fully compliant with free-speech laws, chanted and sang for an hour on a beautiful clear afternoon.

Previously, we’d heard from six speakers, including me and Bonnie McKinlay of the Chapter Beyond Coal campaign.  We were among the 1,252 people arrested at the Tar Sands Action protests at the White House in late August and early September.

We focused on the future at our Portland event: More than 100 people signed up for more involvement, and we passed out 200 brochures on ways people can get involved with all types of Club activities and other organizations that share Sierra Club values.

And now we’ve learned that President Obama has heard enough of our urgent message to at least delay the pipeline for additional environmental review for a year and a half – well after the 2012 voting.

And that’s where Ontario comes in.  They’ve taken the opposite path from Alberta.  Instead of drowning their eggs in a basket of toxic fossil fuel waste, they are hatching renewable chickens!

In 2010, Ontario passed the first true “feed-in tariff” program in North American, where utilities are required to pay folks who generate renewable energy a guaranteed contract price that lets them finance their equipment and generate a fair return on investment. Oregon currently has a small-scale pilot feed-in tariff, which has been highly successful, and needs to be improved and expanded.

Through its program, in just one year, the Ontario Green Energy & Green Economy Act has generated five thousand megawatts of renewable-energy capacity and created more than 40,000 jobs.  Most new solar photovoltaic and other renewable-energy systems are being installed in small- and medium-sized configurations, on individual homes and public buildings, on churches and farms and factories.  Many are being done as community-based projects with many neighbors or tribal members participating in common: even renters can own a piece of a solar system!

As a result of this dramatic explosion of clean energy and green jobs, Ontario will close all of their coal-fired power plants by 2014!

Here in Oregon, the Sierra Club is once again leading the way.  Chapter leaders have developed a strategic alliance with Oregonians for Renewable Energy Policy (OREP), a leading non-profit working on a feed-in tariff program for our state, and other clean energy organizations.  The groups plan to influence the development of the Governor’s 10-year energy plan, including a hoped for expansion of Oregon’s small-scale pilot feed-in tariff program.

The Oregon Sierra Club is also leading the way on energy efficiency. Working with Clean Energy Works Oregon, the Oregon Chapter is promoting deep weatherization: a powerful remodeling program that allows homeowners to cut energy use dramatically while improving the livability, comfort, and value of their homes.  This program provides for loans that are repaid through utility bills, providing convenience to the homeowner and security to the lender.

Overall, the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club is showing the way on both the positive and the negative: stepping out front to stop destructive efforts like the Keystone XL, coal export, and LNG terminals and pipelines – and simultaneously taking concrete, practical steps to create the sensible clean energy future and good local jobs we all know we need.

Alberta vs. Ontario?  We’re choosing Ontario!

PGE, Sierra Club and Allies Settle Boardman Coal Emission Lawsuit

July 20, 2011

PGE will be legally bound to close its harmful Boardman coal plant within 10 years and significantly reduce its acid-rain causing pollution under an agreement struck between the utility, the Sierra Club and our allies.

The end of burning coal in Oregon is not just a good idea for our clean air, clean water and public health, it will be a certainty within 10 years under a deal negotiated by the Sierra Club and our allies.

After years of legal and administrative wrangling, Portland General Electric (PGE) has finally agreed to settle a Clean Air Act lawsuit over harmful emissions from its Boardman coal fired power plant in eastern Oregon. A coalition of environmental groups including the Sierra Club, Friends of the Columbia Gorge, Columbia Riverkeeper, Hells Canyon Preservation Council, and the Northwest Environmental Defense Center – represented by the Pacific Environmental Advocacy Center – brought suit against PGE in 2008 over Clean Air Act violations dating back decades.

Once approved by the Environmental Protection Agency and the courts, the legal settlement will cement in a 2020 closure date PGE pledged to abide by last year after receiving approvals from state agencies. It will also lead to greater reductions in acid rain causing sulfur dioxide than PGE originally agreed to, and $2.5 million in funding over the next decade for environmental restoration in the Columbia Gorge and northeast Oregon – two areas negatively affected by Boardman’s air pollution since the late 1970’s –  as well as investments in reducing air pollution and local renewable energy projects to replace fossil fuels, like rooftop solar.

Here is a link to the Sierra Club’s press release, noting that the Boardman closure marks a milestone in the Club’s national Beyond Coal campaign, which has to date led to the phaseout of some 30,000 megawatts of coal at 153 coal plants, whose carbon emissions total the equivalent of roughly 36 million automobiles.

In addition to creating a legally binding shutdown date that PGE cannot wiggle out of, as well as securing greater reductions in harmful sulfur dioxide than PGE had agreed to last year, PGE has also agreed to pay $2.5 million into a fund managed by the Oregon Community Foundation which will provide:

  • $1 million for habitat protection and environmental restoration in the Columbia River Gorge;
  • $625,000 for habitat protection and restoration in the Blue Mountains, Hells Canyon and Wallowa Mountains;
  • $500,000 for local clean energy projects, such as solar panels on houses; and
  • $375,000 for community-based efforts to reduce air pollution.

“Oregon is among those states showing that we can do better than the dirty business of coal,” said Bill Corcoran, Western Region Director for the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign.  “A healthier and brighter future is arriving in America.”


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