Jordan Cove Admits to Contemplating LNG Export Facility


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
March 16, 2011

Jordan Cove Admits to Contemplating LNG Export Facility
Landowners Outraged At Prospect of the Use of Eminent Domain for Private Gain

After years of denying that the Jordan Cove LNG project had any intention of exporting domestic natural gas, Jordan Cove Project Manager Bob Braddock now admits they are seriously considering export due to cheap, surplus domestic natural gas supplies.  Growing U.S. natural gas supplies make an LNG import facility unnecessary and not economically viable.

In a statement to Platt’s LNG Daily in an article titled, “US West Coast LNG proposal mulls exports, faces hurdles,” Braddock stated, “We have received inquires from people who have production so we are starting to mull it (export) over in our minds…If they came to us and said, ‘we would like you to switch to exporting’, we would”.

Monica Vaughan, with the conservation group Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center, reacted to the new admission by the LNG industry that they may seek a West Coast export port. “For years, Oregonians have fiercely opposed the use of eminent domain and the destruction of our natural resources for unneeded LNG import projects.  Now, with the admission that Jordan Cove LNG will seek to export LNG, the negative impacts of LNG are even more unjustifiable.” In the Platt’s article, the Oregon LNG proposal on the Columbia River in Warrenton also indicated that they may consider export.

Oregonians, including farmers, foresters, fishermen, ratepayers and environmental organizations have long been concerned about the potential for the Jordan Cove LNG project to export domestic natural gas. According to these groups, hundreds of families across Oregon are facing the threat of eminent domain for a project that was originally justified for importing LNG, but that may now export gas.

Fierce opposition from citizen groups has been successful in blocking the terminals thus far because of property rights, public safety, and environmental concerns.  In addition, industrial natural gas users have waved red flags about potential increased natural gas costs to manufacturers.

“There is no public benefit to be gained from this project, only loss of private property and gas-payer rate hikes,” said Francis Eatherington, a landowner along the proposed Pacific Connector, which would connect to the Jordan Cove LNG terminal. “The idea that an out-of-state company could gain an easement across my land against my will and build a dangerous pipeline in my community all to make a private profit by selling domestic natural gas is infuriating.”

There is no public benefit to Oregonians from this project.  In fact, the Industrial Energy Consumers of America (IECA) asserts that “exporting without any consumer safeguards could increase the price of natural gas and electricity” in Oregon. Both the IECA and the Oregon Citizen’s Utility Board, a non-profit organization with the mission to protect Oregon utility ratepayers, have expressed opposition and general warnings about the export of domestic natural gas. Even coastal counties approved the pipeline with the caveat the gas only flow one way, banning exports through Douglas and Coos counties.

The proposed Jordan Cove LNG terminal and Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline are projects of the foreign-based Fort Chicago Energy Partners, Pacific Gas & Electric, and Williams. A Williams spokesperson said that permitting would be complicated and current permits for the pipeline to move gas from Coos Bay to Malin would need to be greatly amended.  Project opponents vowed to vigorously oppose and shift to export LNG from Jordan Cove LNG or Oregon LNG in Warrenton.

Added Vaughan, “We are simply not going to stand by and allow the LNG industry to pull this massive bait-and-switch.”

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Contacts:

Monica Vaughan, Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center, (541) 521-1832
Francis Eatherington, Douglas County Landowner on Pacific Connector, (541) 643-1309
Dan Serres, Conservation Director, Columbia Riverkeeper (503) 890-2441
Brian Pasko, Oregon Sierra Club (503-704-2188

One Response to Jordan Cove Admits to Contemplating LNG Export Facility

  1. […] But wait. Here’s the most remarkable development, reported March 17, 2011: “After years of denying that the Jordan Cove LNG project had any intention of exporting domestic natural gas, Jordan Cove Project Manager Bob Braddock now admits they are seriously considering export due to cheap, surplus domestic natural gas supplies. Growing U.S. natural gas supplies make an LNG import facility unnecessary and not economically viable.” [my emphasis added] (orsierraclub.wordpress.com/2011/03/17/jordan-cove-admits-to-contemplating-lng-export-facility/) […]

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