Governor issues draft 10-year energy plan – Comments Due July 31

July 12, 2012

In early June, Governor Kitzhaber unveiled a draft 10-year energy plan for the state of Oregon. The plan focuses on strategies geared at ensuring that Oregon will meet significant greenhouse gas reduction goals and strengthen our economy by moving away from fossil fuels, like coal. The Governor is taking comments on the plan until July 31, and three public meetings are being held to take testimony

Click here to send the Governor a letter asking for a strong 10-year plan to move Oregon beyond coal and towards a clean energy future!

If you can, please also attend one of the upcoming public meetings:

KLAMATH FALLS
Wednesday, July 18th, 5:30pm-7:30pm
Location:
Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), 3201 Campus Drive, College Union Auditorium,

BEND
Thursday, July 19th, 5:30pm-7:30pm; Location: Central Oregon Community College (COCC), 2600 NW College Way, Pioneer 201 Auditorium,

GRESHAM
Friday, July 20th, 5:30-7:30pm
Location: Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC), 6000 SE Stark St., Visual Arts Theater (in back)

Key points to make in your public testimony and comments:

  • The plan should require all Oregon utilities to make major gains in phasing out coal power between now and 2020.
  • New energy needs over the next decade should be obtained with substantial increases in energy efficiency and conservation in homes, public buildings and commercial buildings; through the creation of ‘energy performance scores’ for buildings; and expansion of the Clean Energy Works weatherization program.
  • The plan should increase ‘distributed energy’ like rooftop solar across the state, and should include a large-scale, state-wide ‘feed-in tariff’ program to allow homeowners, small businesses, farmers, houses of worship, and local governments to be paid a fair rate by utilities for producing clean energy.
  • The plan should make Oregon’s greenhouse gas reduction goals legally binding to push all utilities to reduce coal use, and should also expand the state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard to obtain 33% of the state’s energy from new renewable sources by 2025.
  • The plan should ensure that state and federal permits for the export of coal and liquefied natural gas (LNG) are not issued. If approved by state agencies, coal and LNG export could render irrelevant all of Oregon’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

You can submit your own comments on the plan by emailing tenyearenergyplan.comments@odoe.state.or.us or by clicking here.

In unveiling the draft 10-year energy plan, the Governor wrote:

Oregon has a track record of successfully pursuing clean energy policy, programs and practices to reduce energy use and promote renewable alternatives to fossil fuels. These public and private initiatives have made Oregon a national leader, but we continue to face a fundamental challenge –
that is, to develop a comprehensive energy strategy that meets the state’s carbon reduction, energy conservation and renewable energy goals and timetables, and that balances complex needs – including affordability and reliability – while enhancing Oregon’s economic objectives.

This 10-Year Energy Action Plan takes a practical approach to that challenge, focusing on specific initiatives that move the dial in the short term and can be scaled up over time. It is also an economic action plan, emphasizing priorities that can get Oregonians back to work on energy related projects in urban and rural communities across the state.

The Governor’s plan is an important opportunity to accelerate our region’s transition from a fossil fuel dependent energy and transportation system to a clean energy future. We encourage all Oregonians concerned about the growing harms from climate change and the need for urgency and decisive action to weigh in to help create a final plan that will result in decisive near term and long term actions.

You can email comments here until July 31 by clicking here.

And you can read both the plan and background materials here, as well as sign up for email updates.

We thank Governor Kitzhaber for bringing Oregonians together to focus on a 10-year energy plan for the state designed to significantly reduce reliance on fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas.


Pacificorp Still Hooked on Dirty Coal

November 11, 2011

Massive open pit coal mine in the Powder River Basin along the Wyoming/Montana border. Coal is dirty business.

Pacificorp, Oregon’s second largest utility, is hooked on coal.

The company has plans to continue long-term operation of multiple dirty coal plants to provide energy to its Oregon customers, retrofitting ancient coal facilities despite the cost to consumers and the benefits of switching to clean energy.

In filings before the Oregon Public Utility Commission in its 2011 ‘integrated resource plan,’ the company has made it clear it will keep burning dirty coal long into the future, diverting ratepayer money away from renewable energy and energy efficiency and into costly investments that will extend the life of a number of their coal plants.

Pacificorp’s coal problem is so bad, Oregon regulators are starting to take a hard look at the company’s plans and are poised to make a decision as soon as December 6 that could force the company to seek alternatives to continuing to operate its coal fleet in perpetuity – alternatives like shutting some of the dirtiest plants down and replacing them with renewable energy and investments in energy efficiency.

Unlike Portland General Electric, which has agreed to close its Boardman coal plant in 2020 rather than extend its life by decades, Pacificorp does not operate any coal plants in Oregon. However, it either owns or gets power from burning coal and coal mining in states like Utah, Wyoming, and Montana, supplying Oregonians across the state with dirty energy.

Concerned about Pacificorp’s addiction to dirty coal?

Write a letter to the editor of the Oregonian newspaper:

Here are some key points to make:

1) Pacificorp is doing Oregon customers a disservice by spending ratepayer money burning coal rather than investing in clean alternatives.

2) The company should provide more details on the costs and risks associated with continuing to burn coal, rather than closing old plants and investing money in cleaner alternatives, like generating renewable energy in Oregon.

3) The Oregon Public Utility Commission should reject Pacificorp’s latest plans to invest in dirty coal. Portland General Electric did the right thing by closing their dirty Boardman coal plant, Pacificorp should do the same.

4) Pacificorp should be investing Oregon ratepayer money into projects that create Oregon jobs through energy efficiency and home weatherization, as well as developing new renewable energy sources.

Here’s how to send a letter to the Oregonian:

Letters to the editor, The Oregonian
1320 S.W. Broadway
Portland, Or., 97201

Or e-mail to: letters@oregonian.com

They may also be faxed to (503) 294-4193.

Please limit letters to 150 words. Please include your full address and daytime phone number, for verification only. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


Keystone tar sands pipeline on hold!

November 11, 2011

Sierra Club activists protest the Keystone tar sands pipeline at Pioneer Courthouse in Portland in solidarity with thousands outside the White House on November 6.

After months of input from hundreds of thousands of people, and recent protests from the White House to Portland, the Obama administration has decided to reevaluate the environmental review of the dirty Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline. This massive pipeline would bring oil mined from the tar sands underneath the wild boreal forests of Alberta to oil refineries on the Texas Gulf coast, further hooking the US on the dirtiest of fossil fuels.

Send a thank you note to President Obama to taking action to delay the Keystone pipeline!

In Portland on November 6, Sierra Club activists rallied in solidarity with a simultaneous protest against the Keystone pipeline in Washington, DC, which drew some 12,000 people to the White House.

Here’s a recap from one of the organizers of the Portland event, Ted Gleichman, co-chair of the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club’s anti-LNG committee:

Alberta vs. Ontario: What does that mean for the energy and climate future of Oregon?

First, Alberta: This past Sunday, November 6, the Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club was the key grass-roots environmental group working with Occupy Portland in a peaceful and enthusiastic rally and march against the Keystone XL pipeline proposal.

This pipeline would take the dirtiest fossil fuel on the planet, the Alberta Tar Sands, 1,700 miles across the Midwest and the Ogallala Aquifer to Texas Gulf Coast refineries.  Whether it would then be burned in our vehicles or exported to China, it would be the most drastic contribution to irreversible global warming of anything we could do in North America.  A sour deal on every level, this pipeline must be stopped.

Sierra Club volunteers, with staff support, worked with Occupiers to demonstrate West Coast solidarity with “Hands Around the White House,” where 12,000 people demonstrated three and four deep to urge President Obama to stand against further exploitation of the Tar Sands – one year to the day before the 2012 general election.

The Portland event completely encircled the downtown block of the historic Pioneer Courthouse, at the busiest transit intersection in the city.  The 250 demonstrators, fully compliant with free-speech laws, chanted and sang for an hour on a beautiful clear afternoon.

Previously, we’d heard from six speakers, including me and Bonnie McKinlay of the Chapter Beyond Coal campaign.  We were among the 1,252 people arrested at the Tar Sands Action protests at the White House in late August and early September.

We focused on the future at our Portland event: More than 100 people signed up for more involvement, and we passed out 200 brochures on ways people can get involved with all types of Club activities and other organizations that share Sierra Club values.

And now we’ve learned that President Obama has heard enough of our urgent message to at least delay the pipeline for additional environmental review for a year and a half – well after the 2012 voting.

And that’s where Ontario comes in.  They’ve taken the opposite path from Alberta.  Instead of drowning their eggs in a basket of toxic fossil fuel waste, they are hatching renewable chickens!

In 2010, Ontario passed the first true “feed-in tariff” program in North American, where utilities are required to pay folks who generate renewable energy a guaranteed contract price that lets them finance their equipment and generate a fair return on investment. Oregon currently has a small-scale pilot feed-in tariff, which has been highly successful, and needs to be improved and expanded.

Through its program, in just one year, the Ontario Green Energy & Green Economy Act has generated five thousand megawatts of renewable-energy capacity and created more than 40,000 jobs.  Most new solar photovoltaic and other renewable-energy systems are being installed in small- and medium-sized configurations, on individual homes and public buildings, on churches and farms and factories.  Many are being done as community-based projects with many neighbors or tribal members participating in common: even renters can own a piece of a solar system!

As a result of this dramatic explosion of clean energy and green jobs, Ontario will close all of their coal-fired power plants by 2014!

Here in Oregon, the Sierra Club is once again leading the way.  Chapter leaders have developed a strategic alliance with Oregonians for Renewable Energy Policy (OREP), a leading non-profit working on a feed-in tariff program for our state, and other clean energy organizations.  The groups plan to influence the development of the Governor’s 10-year energy plan, including a hoped for expansion of Oregon’s small-scale pilot feed-in tariff program.

The Oregon Sierra Club is also leading the way on energy efficiency. Working with Clean Energy Works Oregon, the Oregon Chapter is promoting deep weatherization: a powerful remodeling program that allows homeowners to cut energy use dramatically while improving the livability, comfort, and value of their homes.  This program provides for loans that are repaid through utility bills, providing convenience to the homeowner and security to the lender.

Overall, the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club is showing the way on both the positive and the negative: stepping out front to stop destructive efforts like the Keystone XL, coal export, and LNG terminals and pipelines – and simultaneously taking concrete, practical steps to create the sensible clean energy future and good local jobs we all know we need.

Alberta vs. Ontario?  We’re choosing Ontario!


Enjoy an old-fashioned ice cream social and find out if you qualify for a free home energy assessment!

June 27, 2011
Ice Cream and an Energy Audit! Man vs Ice Cream

RSVP Today!

Learn about new financial incentives, available for a limited time, to make qualified homes more energy efficient — with no upfront costs.

While the kids enjoy three-legged races and other classic games, you’ll find out how Sierra Club’s non-profit partner, Clean Energy Works Oregon, cuts through red tape to help homeowners identify, analyze, and finance their energy improvement projects. Complete with fun-filled games for all ages, this is a perfect way to familiarize yourself with affordable ways to reduce your home’s energy consumption in a relaxed setting.

Sierra Club staff, certified contractors, and satisfied CEWO homeowners will be available to answer questions.
.

WHAT:  Home energy efficiency:
new financial incentives and ice cream!
HOW:  Old-fashioned games, brief info session,
Q&A with home energy experts
WHEN: Sunday, July 31
1:00 PM
WHERE: Grant Park picnic pavilion at northeast edge/NE 36th Ave and NE Brazee St
 
Click here to join us!

If you’d like more information about this event, CEWO, or would like to volunteer please contact Benn Davenport: benn.davenport[at]sierraclub[dot]org or 503-238-0442 x307

See you this Sunday at the Park!

Benn Davenport,
Conservation Program Coordinator: Energy Efficient Homes
Sierra Club
(503) 238-0442 x307
.

PS: Do you qualify for a free energy assessment?  Apply at www.CEWO.org and use Sierra Club’s instant rebate code, COHRA012(that’s zero, one, two).  Applying is easy and won’t commit you to the program until you’re ready.Spread the word! Share this event with your friends, family and colleagues! You can also post it to your social networks with these handy links:
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