Pacificorp Still Hooked on Dirty Coal

November 11, 2011

Massive open pit coal mine in the Powder River Basin along the Wyoming/Montana border. Coal is dirty business.

Pacificorp, Oregon’s second largest utility, is hooked on coal.

The company has plans to continue long-term operation of multiple dirty coal plants to provide energy to its Oregon customers, retrofitting ancient coal facilities despite the cost to consumers and the benefits of switching to clean energy.

In filings before the Oregon Public Utility Commission in its 2011 ‘integrated resource plan,’ the company has made it clear it will keep burning dirty coal long into the future, diverting ratepayer money away from renewable energy and energy efficiency and into costly investments that will extend the life of a number of their coal plants.

Pacificorp’s coal problem is so bad, Oregon regulators are starting to take a hard look at the company’s plans and are poised to make a decision as soon as December 6 that could force the company to seek alternatives to continuing to operate its coal fleet in perpetuity – alternatives like shutting some of the dirtiest plants down and replacing them with renewable energy and investments in energy efficiency.

Unlike Portland General Electric, which has agreed to close its Boardman coal plant in 2020 rather than extend its life by decades, Pacificorp does not operate any coal plants in Oregon. However, it either owns or gets power from burning coal and coal mining in states like Utah, Wyoming, and Montana, supplying Oregonians across the state with dirty energy.

Concerned about Pacificorp’s addiction to dirty coal?

Write a letter to the editor of the Oregonian newspaper:

Here are some key points to make:

1) Pacificorp is doing Oregon customers a disservice by spending ratepayer money burning coal rather than investing in clean alternatives.

2) The company should provide more details on the costs and risks associated with continuing to burn coal, rather than closing old plants and investing money in cleaner alternatives, like generating renewable energy in Oregon.

3) The Oregon Public Utility Commission should reject Pacificorp’s latest plans to invest in dirty coal. Portland General Electric did the right thing by closing their dirty Boardman coal plant, Pacificorp should do the same.

4) Pacificorp should be investing Oregon ratepayer money into projects that create Oregon jobs through energy efficiency and home weatherization, as well as developing new renewable energy sources.

Here’s how to send a letter to the Oregonian:

Letters to the editor, The Oregonian
1320 S.W. Broadway
Portland, Or., 97201

Or e-mail to: letters@oregonian.com

They may also be faxed to (503) 294-4193.

Please limit letters to 150 words. Please include your full address and daytime phone number, for verification only. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


Keystone tar sands pipeline on hold!

November 11, 2011

Sierra Club activists protest the Keystone tar sands pipeline at Pioneer Courthouse in Portland in solidarity with thousands outside the White House on November 6.

After months of input from hundreds of thousands of people, and recent protests from the White House to Portland, the Obama administration has decided to reevaluate the environmental review of the dirty Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline. This massive pipeline would bring oil mined from the tar sands underneath the wild boreal forests of Alberta to oil refineries on the Texas Gulf coast, further hooking the US on the dirtiest of fossil fuels.

Send a thank you note to President Obama to taking action to delay the Keystone pipeline!

In Portland on November 6, Sierra Club activists rallied in solidarity with a simultaneous protest against the Keystone pipeline in Washington, DC, which drew some 12,000 people to the White House.

Here’s a recap from one of the organizers of the Portland event, Ted Gleichman, co-chair of the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club’s anti-LNG committee:

Alberta vs. Ontario: What does that mean for the energy and climate future of Oregon?

First, Alberta: This past Sunday, November 6, the Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club was the key grass-roots environmental group working with Occupy Portland in a peaceful and enthusiastic rally and march against the Keystone XL pipeline proposal.

This pipeline would take the dirtiest fossil fuel on the planet, the Alberta Tar Sands, 1,700 miles across the Midwest and the Ogallala Aquifer to Texas Gulf Coast refineries.  Whether it would then be burned in our vehicles or exported to China, it would be the most drastic contribution to irreversible global warming of anything we could do in North America.  A sour deal on every level, this pipeline must be stopped.

Sierra Club volunteers, with staff support, worked with Occupiers to demonstrate West Coast solidarity with “Hands Around the White House,” where 12,000 people demonstrated three and four deep to urge President Obama to stand against further exploitation of the Tar Sands – one year to the day before the 2012 general election.

The Portland event completely encircled the downtown block of the historic Pioneer Courthouse, at the busiest transit intersection in the city.  The 250 demonstrators, fully compliant with free-speech laws, chanted and sang for an hour on a beautiful clear afternoon.

Previously, we’d heard from six speakers, including me and Bonnie McKinlay of the Chapter Beyond Coal campaign.  We were among the 1,252 people arrested at the Tar Sands Action protests at the White House in late August and early September.

We focused on the future at our Portland event: More than 100 people signed up for more involvement, and we passed out 200 brochures on ways people can get involved with all types of Club activities and other organizations that share Sierra Club values.

And now we’ve learned that President Obama has heard enough of our urgent message to at least delay the pipeline for additional environmental review for a year and a half – well after the 2012 voting.

And that’s where Ontario comes in.  They’ve taken the opposite path from Alberta.  Instead of drowning their eggs in a basket of toxic fossil fuel waste, they are hatching renewable chickens!

In 2010, Ontario passed the first true “feed-in tariff” program in North American, where utilities are required to pay folks who generate renewable energy a guaranteed contract price that lets them finance their equipment and generate a fair return on investment. Oregon currently has a small-scale pilot feed-in tariff, which has been highly successful, and needs to be improved and expanded.

Through its program, in just one year, the Ontario Green Energy & Green Economy Act has generated five thousand megawatts of renewable-energy capacity and created more than 40,000 jobs.  Most new solar photovoltaic and other renewable-energy systems are being installed in small- and medium-sized configurations, on individual homes and public buildings, on churches and farms and factories.  Many are being done as community-based projects with many neighbors or tribal members participating in common: even renters can own a piece of a solar system!

As a result of this dramatic explosion of clean energy and green jobs, Ontario will close all of their coal-fired power plants by 2014!

Here in Oregon, the Sierra Club is once again leading the way.  Chapter leaders have developed a strategic alliance with Oregonians for Renewable Energy Policy (OREP), a leading non-profit working on a feed-in tariff program for our state, and other clean energy organizations.  The groups plan to influence the development of the Governor’s 10-year energy plan, including a hoped for expansion of Oregon’s small-scale pilot feed-in tariff program.

The Oregon Sierra Club is also leading the way on energy efficiency. Working with Clean Energy Works Oregon, the Oregon Chapter is promoting deep weatherization: a powerful remodeling program that allows homeowners to cut energy use dramatically while improving the livability, comfort, and value of their homes.  This program provides for loans that are repaid through utility bills, providing convenience to the homeowner and security to the lender.

Overall, the Oregon Chapter Sierra Club is showing the way on both the positive and the negative: stepping out front to stop destructive efforts like the Keystone XL, coal export, and LNG terminals and pipelines – and simultaneously taking concrete, practical steps to create the sensible clean energy future and good local jobs we all know we need.

Alberta vs. Ontario?  We’re choosing Ontario!


PGE, Sierra Club and Allies Settle Boardman Coal Emission Lawsuit

July 20, 2011

PGE will be legally bound to close its harmful Boardman coal plant within 10 years and significantly reduce its acid-rain causing pollution under an agreement struck between the utility, the Sierra Club and our allies.

The end of burning coal in Oregon is not just a good idea for our clean air, clean water and public health, it will be a certainty within 10 years under a deal negotiated by the Sierra Club and our allies.

After years of legal and administrative wrangling, Portland General Electric (PGE) has finally agreed to settle a Clean Air Act lawsuit over harmful emissions from its Boardman coal fired power plant in eastern Oregon. A coalition of environmental groups including the Sierra Club, Friends of the Columbia Gorge, Columbia Riverkeeper, Hells Canyon Preservation Council, and the Northwest Environmental Defense Center – represented by the Pacific Environmental Advocacy Center – brought suit against PGE in 2008 over Clean Air Act violations dating back decades.

Once approved by the Environmental Protection Agency and the courts, the legal settlement will cement in a 2020 closure date PGE pledged to abide by last year after receiving approvals from state agencies. It will also lead to greater reductions in acid rain causing sulfur dioxide than PGE originally agreed to, and $2.5 million in funding over the next decade for environmental restoration in the Columbia Gorge and northeast Oregon – two areas negatively affected by Boardman’s air pollution since the late 1970’s –  as well as investments in reducing air pollution and local renewable energy projects to replace fossil fuels, like rooftop solar.

Here is a link to the Sierra Club’s press release, noting that the Boardman closure marks a milestone in the Club’s national Beyond Coal campaign, which has to date led to the phaseout of some 30,000 megawatts of coal at 153 coal plants, whose carbon emissions total the equivalent of roughly 36 million automobiles.

In addition to creating a legally binding shutdown date that PGE cannot wiggle out of, as well as securing greater reductions in harmful sulfur dioxide than PGE had agreed to last year, PGE has also agreed to pay $2.5 million into a fund managed by the Oregon Community Foundation which will provide:

  • $1 million for habitat protection and environmental restoration in the Columbia River Gorge;
  • $625,000 for habitat protection and restoration in the Blue Mountains, Hells Canyon and Wallowa Mountains;
  • $500,000 for local clean energy projects, such as solar panels on houses; and
  • $375,000 for community-based efforts to reduce air pollution.

“Oregon is among those states showing that we can do better than the dirty business of coal,” said Bill Corcoran, Western Region Director for the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign.  “A healthier and brighter future is arriving in America.”


State Legislative Update – End of Session Edition

June 16, 2011

The Oregon State Capitol in Salem.

The 2011 Oregon Legislature is entering its final days. Scheduled to wrap up work by June 30, some are predicting the session will end as early as the week of June 20. Many major budget bills are done and on the way to the Governor’s desk. The Sierra Club will be scoring the votes of legislators and the legislature as a whole once the session is over, but based on work completed so far, this is shaping up to be a fairly lackluster session for the environment.

While there have been some positive accomplishments, most notably a significant overhaul of Oregon’s bottle bill, and strong prospects for passage of school weatherization legislation early next week (see below), the Sierra Club and other conservation groups have had to focus on defense, stopping bad bills that would: ramp up unsustainable logging on state forests; make it easier to shoot wolves; overturn voter approved bans on hunting cougars with dogs; stop the DEQ from adopting new water quality protection rules; exempt biomass energy from greenhouse gas reporting programs; and expedite state permitting for proposed LNG pipelines.

Meanwhile, many positive bills have stalled, including a ban on single use plastic bags; an expansion of Oregon’s marine reserve system; a ban on the toxic chemical Bisphenol A (BPA) in children’s food containers; the creation of a system of protected conservation areas on state lands; and an effort create jobs through energy efficiency in residential and commercial buildings.

Despite this, a key priority of the Sierra Club and Governor John Kitzhaber is on the right path in the legislature’s last days. HB 2960, the ‘cool schools’ bill, will set up a fund to allow schools across the state to weatherize and upgrade their heating and cooling systems. This will create jobs, save school districts money on utility bills over the long term so that more money can be invested in education, and make schools more comfortable and better learning environments for kids. This bill passed the House early last week, and is scheduled for a vote in the Senate Monday, June 20. Please email your Senators in support of HB 2960 TODAY!

Thank you for your support this legislative session. Check out our legislative tracker for more specific status updates on a range of environmental bills we’ve worked on this session.


Sierra Club, RS Energy Launch Rooftop Solar Campaign

June 13, 2011

For Immediate Release:   June 13, 2011

Sierra Club, RS Energy Launch Rooftop Solar Campaign
Program will save homeowners thousands and create green jobs
by offering best solar installation rates in Oregon

Portland, OR – Today, the Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club and Tualatin-based RS Energy announced a groundbreaking agreement that will provide rooftop solar installations at rates that almost every Oregon homeowner can afford.  The discounts will be offered to the Sierra Club’s approximately 20,000 members in the state, as well as to homeowners who choose to become Sierra Club members.

“We’re thrilled about this opportunity to empower our members and supporters to save thousands of dollars on their energy bills and be part of shaping Oregon’s clean energy future,” said Brian Pasko, Director of the Sierra Club’s Oregon Chapter.  “Moving Oregon beyond the use of coal as an energy source has been a key priority for the Sierra Club for years, and this new program is integral to the success of that campaign. We recognize that our own members and citizens across the state have a real opportunity to influence Oregon’s future energy mix, and we’re excited to be able to help them seize that opportunity!”

The program guarantees one of the lowest solar installation rates in Oregon and is estimated to save the average homeowner $10,000 or more on their energy bills over the life of the installed system.  Typical customers will see immediate reductions of 25% or more on their electricity costs.

After an extensive review, the Sierra Club chose to partner with local solar installer RS Energy, which enjoys a reputation as one of Oregon’s premier solar installers.  RS Energy shares the Sierra Club’s commitment to creating a vibrant clean energy economy and intends to make a financial contribution to the Sierra Club’s work to protect Oregon’s environment for every kilowatt hour of solar installed through the program.

“We are excited to work with the Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club to bring affordable, clean energy to Oregon homeowners. This innovative partnership reduces Oregonians’ electric bills, cuts our dependence on fossil fuel, and creates one green job for every seven projects completed,” said David Richards, a Partner at RS Energy.

Interested homeowners will receive a free solar evaluation of their home, and will be presented with a range of affordable solar options tailored to fit a particular homeowner’s energy use and financial needs.

“If you asked me six months ago what I thought about solar in Oregon, I would have said ‘no way’ – that you’d have to be rich to install rooftop solar in our rainy region,” said Pasko.  “But, after our work with RS Energy I am so convinced of the promise of this program that I was the first to sign up!” Last week Pasko and his wife installed 18 solar panels on their home in Boring, Oregon. “I’m ready to tell my neighbors across Oregon about this amazing opportunity to save a lot of money, encourage energy independence, create new jobs, and protect our planet,” said Pasko.

More information about the “Go Solar with the Sierra Club” program can be found at http://www.oregon.sierraclub.org/solar.

###


EPA Proposes Strong Safeguards to Protect Children from Hazardous Pollution from Coal Plants

March 16, 2011

The Boardman Coal plant is a major source of mercury pollution and other harmful air emissions in Oregon.

Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a critical air quality standard to protect Americans against life-threatening air pollution such as mercury, arsenic and other air toxics from power plants, which are currently allowed to emit hazardous air pollution without national limits. The long-overdue and critically important mercury and air toxic standard updates Clean Air Act provisions and establishes emission limits for the nation’s fleet of power plants. According to EPA, each year the new protection will save as many as 17,000 lives and prevent 120,000 cases of childhood asthma.

“As a father of two young children, I am proud to see the EPA announcing such strong protections from toxic mercury,” said Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune. “These protections will benefit women, children and all Americans concerned about the dirty coal industry making them sick.”

Air toxics include some of the most hazardous air pollutants to human health, and most of them come from dirty power plants. In addition to mercury and arsenic, these polluters emit lead, other heavy metals, dioxin and acid gases that threaten public health and child development. Even in small amounts these extremely harmful air pollutants are linked to cancer, heart disease, neurological damage, birth defects, asthma attacks and premature death.

Mercury emitted from power plants is particularly harmful because it builds up in people who eat mercury-contaminated fish. A potent neurotoxin especially dangerous to small children and fetuses, mercury exposure even in small amounts has been linked to developmental disorders and learning disabilities. According to EPA studies, the mercury problem in the U.S. is so widespread that at least 1 in 12 – and as many as 1 in 6 – American women of childbearing age have enough mercury in their bodies to put a fetus at risk.

“For decades, Big Coal and Big Oil have fought Clean Air Act protections that would have reduced pollution from their facilities, even though coal plants are the largest sources of dangerous air pollution,” said Mary Anne Hitt, Director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign. “I am sure that polluters will try to weaken these protections for our children, but the American people will not let that happen.”

As outlined by the Clean Air Act, the EPA and Administrator Lisa Jackson will set new air toxics pollution limits based on the pollution reduction methods already in use at the cleanest and best-performing facilities in the nation. This approach will lead to safeguards that both reduce air pollution and protect public health. These protections will also help the economy, as a recent study of the 1990 Clean Air Act showed that existing standards contributed $2 trillion in economic activity to the economy while saving lives.


The Northwest is Moving Beyond Coal

March 16, 2011

Open pit coal mine in the Powder River Basin. These mines feed the Northwest's only two coal plants and could be exported from ports along the Columbia River and burned in China under current proposals.

Late last year, the Oregon Environmental Quality Commission issued a final rule setting a 2020 timeline for closing Oregon’s only coal fired power plant, while approving a series of pollution controls that will significantly reduce haze and acid rain causing pollution in the meantime.

Now, our friends in Washington have secured a timeline for closing their only coal plant! In early March, a deal was brokered by Washington Governor Chris Gregoire, key legislators, environmental groups and labor unions to close the 1460 MW Transalta coal plant, located just 90 miles north of Portland. One boiler will close in 2020, the other in 2025, with interim pollution controls installed in 2013. A bill enshrining this plan has already passed the Washington Senate and there is hope the Washington House will take similar action soon.

Through the hard work of the Sierra Club and our allies, the Pacific Northwest is now firmly on a path towards a coal free future!

In other recent news, a company proposing to build a huge coal export terminal at the Port of Longview across from Oregon on the Columbia River has withdrawn its permit application after being caught misleading decision makers and the public about the scale and potential impacts of its operation. After Millenium Bulk Logistics received approval from Cowlitz County to construct a coal export terminal in order to annually ship 5 million tons of coal mined in Wyoming and Montana to China last year, the Sierra Club and allies appealed the permit, saying the facility would threaten public health and run counter to state efforts to curb carbon pollution and build a clean energy economy. The Washington Department of Ecology also intervened, contending that the permit had not considered the full impacts of the coal export facility. In February, internal company documents revealed the true scope of the project and that the company was actually planning to build a terminal capable of shipping as much as 80 million tons of coal and had not disclosed this information in public hearings.

Advocates expect Millenium to refile for a another permit, and other companies are also seeking to construct coal export terminals in the Pacific Northwest. As the Northwest stops burning coal, major mining companies in Montana and Wyoming are seeking access to Columbia River and other Northwest ports to ship this coal to China. This will continue to be one of the major environmental fights in our region. For more information on how to get involved in the Sierra Club’s coal export efforts, please email Cesia Kearns.

In addition to the climate impacts of burning coal, when coal is burned in China, it presents significant issues of mercury deposition in the Pacific Northwest. Already, mercury contamination is a major concern for Oregon’s rivers, streams, and for those that eat fish. Further, the potential for significant amounts of coal dust rising from thousands of coal trains and huge coal piles along the Columbia River presents significant health risks for local communities.


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