Stakeholder Group Sends Ideas to the Board of Forestry


The first milestone towards a new Forest Management Plans for our North Coast State Forests has concluded with a stakeholder group sending a variety of proposals to the Board of Forestry for further consideration. In total, five plans were formally presented and a number of other elements were discussed. Not surprisingly, sawmill representatives pushed forward some alarming ideas, including a plan that places timber production over all other values, a plan to treat 70% of the forest like a tree farm, and even a plan to sell our public land to the highest bidder! While ideas like this may indeed provide immediate financial benefit to some, their effect on fish and wildlife habitat, water quality, and recreation opportunities would be devastating.

Oregon’s Forest Practices Act: failing to protect water quality since 1972 (PRIVATE LAND. photo by F. Eatherington)

Clearcuts: better for the environment?  (photo by F. Eatherington)

Clearcuts: better for the environment?
(PRIVATE LAND. photo by F. Eatherington)

Tillamook County Commissioner Tim Josi did not provide a plan of his own, but endorsed all three of the above proposals and called for more clearcuts instead of thinning. He stated that clearcuts have less impact on the environment than thinning operations, though he admitted to a lack of evidence. The Commissioner also rejected the notion that the Department of Forestry should diversify its revenue, instead insisting that the Agency should remain addicted to logging as its only means of funding. Such a path is not a sustainable option for a healthy ODF or healthy forests!

One other proposal, a variation of the current Forest Management Plan, called for modest increases to conservation outcomes and timber harvest levels. Our allies put forward a plan that would achieve the goal of increasing conservation values while partially decoupling the Department’s finances from timber revenue by diversifying its funding. This vision would drastically help to create better fish and wildlife habitat and recreation opportunities while also allowing the forest to be actively managed.

Considering the recently concluded litigation on the Elliott State Forest, which resulted in some exploratory land sales, the Board of Forestry should strongly consider obtaining a Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) moving forward. An HCP would provide predictability and certainty for timber revenue, by preventing lawsuits and would secure habitat for endangered and threatened species. The big timber representatives rejected this notion, though even Tim Josi is open to the idea.

Even as some sawmill interests attempt to wipe conservation areas off the map, the Oregon Department of Forestry is planning a series of open houses to explain and celebrate new High Value Conservation Areas. These events will include self-guided tours, Google Earth maps, and ODF staff answering questions, so mark your calendar:

  • March 17: 6-8pm, Forest Grove ODF District Office, 801 Gales Creek Rd, Forest Grove
  • March 20: 6-8pm, Astoria ODF District Office, 92219 HWY 202, Astoria
  • March 22: 10am-noon, Tillamook District Office, 5005 3rd Street, Tillamook

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To find out more about our effort to protect the Tillamook and Clatsop State Forests, visit forestlegacy.org, check out the Facebook page, or email Chris Smith.

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,567 other followers

%d bloggers like this: