Pacificorp Still Hooked on Dirty Coal

Massive open pit coal mine in the Powder River Basin along the Wyoming/Montana border. Coal is dirty business.

Pacificorp, Oregon’s second largest utility, is hooked on coal.

The company has plans to continue long-term operation of multiple dirty coal plants to provide energy to its Oregon customers, retrofitting ancient coal facilities despite the cost to consumers and the benefits of switching to clean energy.

In filings before the Oregon Public Utility Commission in its 2011 ‘integrated resource plan,’ the company has made it clear it will keep burning dirty coal long into the future, diverting ratepayer money away from renewable energy and energy efficiency and into costly investments that will extend the life of a number of their coal plants.

Pacificorp’s coal problem is so bad, Oregon regulators are starting to take a hard look at the company’s plans and are poised to make a decision as soon as December 6 that could force the company to seek alternatives to continuing to operate its coal fleet in perpetuity – alternatives like shutting some of the dirtiest plants down and replacing them with renewable energy and investments in energy efficiency.

Unlike Portland General Electric, which has agreed to close its Boardman coal plant in 2020 rather than extend its life by decades, Pacificorp does not operate any coal plants in Oregon. However, it either owns or gets power from burning coal and coal mining in states like Utah, Wyoming, and Montana, supplying Oregonians across the state with dirty energy.

Concerned about Pacificorp’s addiction to dirty coal?

Write a letter to the editor of the Oregonian newspaper:

Here are some key points to make:

1) Pacificorp is doing Oregon customers a disservice by spending ratepayer money burning coal rather than investing in clean alternatives.

2) The company should provide more details on the costs and risks associated with continuing to burn coal, rather than closing old plants and investing money in cleaner alternatives, like generating renewable energy in Oregon.

3) The Oregon Public Utility Commission should reject Pacificorp’s latest plans to invest in dirty coal. Portland General Electric did the right thing by closing their dirty Boardman coal plant, Pacificorp should do the same.

4) Pacificorp should be investing Oregon ratepayer money into projects that create Oregon jobs through energy efficiency and home weatherization, as well as developing new renewable energy sources.

Here’s how to send a letter to the Oregonian:

Letters to the editor, The Oregonian
1320 S.W. Broadway
Portland, Or., 97201

Or e-mail to: letters@oregonian.com

They may also be faxed to (503) 294-4193.

Please limit letters to 150 words. Please include your full address and daytime phone number, for verification only. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

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