Prevent Nestlé from Selling Oregon’s Water-Comment Deadline Extended

September 10, 2010
Fish need this water more than a large corporation does.

Take Action to Stop Nestlé from Bottling Oregon’s water!

In early September, Nestlé got one step closer to selling the spring water that comes off Mt. Hood in Oregon’s pristine Columbia River Gorge. We only have until October 29th to stop this disastrous plan to bottle our state’s water. Please take action to make sure Nestlé can’t bottle our water!

The deadline has been extended to October 29th to submit comments urging the denial of the water exchange proposal between Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the city of Cascade Locks. If approved, the city plans to sell your water to Nestle for fractions of a penny per gallon so it can be bottled, shipped out of the watershed and sold for dollars a gallon.  This water exchange would be a major and irreversible step forward for Nestlé and would set a dangerous precedent for water use in the state of Oregon. We have a chance to stop it and effectively shut down Nestlé’s planned water bottling facility. Tell the Oregon Water Resources Department to deny the application from the City of Cascade Locks and keep Oregon’s water in Oregon.

Our coalition of environmental groups has delivered over 4,000 petition signatures to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, garnering local, national, and international media for our efforts to keep Nestlé’s water bottling facility out of the Gorge. But we urgently need you to send in comments today to stop Nestlé from privatizing Oregon’s water!

The Oregon Water Resources Department is only accepting paper letters, either printed or hand-written. If you want to take action now, click here, fill out your contact information and we will print out your letter and present it to them in person–but you must do so by October 27th. If you’d like to write your own personalized letter, we’ve pasted a sample letter below. Your letter must include the application #11109 and must be received by the OWRD by 5:00 pm October 29th.
Thank you for taking action!

To: Phillip Ward

Oregon Water Resources Department
725 Summer Street NE
Suite A
Salem, OR 97301

Re: Water Transfer Application No. 11109

Dear Mr. Ward:

I am writing to you to request that The Oregon Water Resource Department deny the permit application for a water exchange between the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the City of Cascade Locks.

Although the application does not directly state that the beneficiary of the exchange will be Nestle Waters of North America, the exchange would give Cascade Locks the ability to sell the exchanged water to a Nestle water bottling plant. As an Oregon citizen, I am deeply concerned that Oregon may give away a public water resource to a corporation that will bottle it, profit from it and ship it out of the watershed.

Opening the doors to a Nestle bottling plant would lead to a wasteful and potentially unsustainable use of a public resource and negatively impact the quality of life of nearby residents and wildlife.

If the state agency approves the exchange, it risks creating a future water supply shortfall, putting the city of Cascade Locks at the mercy of a multinational corporation with a bad track record in the US and abroad.

I hope that the department will reject this application outright because of the potential disastrous results on the community and sustainability of Oregon’s spring water, a public resource that should be managed for the benefit of Oregonians.

Respectfully,

(Insert your name here)

7 Responses to Prevent Nestlé from Selling Oregon’s Water-Comment Deadline Extended

  1. Randy Harrison says:

    To: Phillip Ward

    Oregon Water Resources Department
    725 Summer Street NE
    Suite A
    Salem, OR 97301

    Re: Water Transfer Application No. 11109

    Dear Mr. Ward:

    I am writing to you to request that The Oregon Water Resource Department deny the permit application for a water exchange between the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the City of Cascade Locks.

    Although the application does not directly state that the beneficiary of the exchange will be Nestle Waters of North America, the exchange would give Cascade Locks the ability to sell the exchanged water to a Nestle water bottling plant. As an Oregon citizen, I am deeply concerned that Oregon may give away a public water resource to a corporation that will bottle it, profit from it and ship it out of the watershed.

    Opening the doors to a Nestle bottling plant would lead to a wasteful and potentially unsustainable use of a public resource and negatively impact the quality of life of nearby residents and wildlife.

    If the state agency approves the exchange, it risks creating a future water supply shortfall, putting the city of Cascade Locks at the mercy of a multinational corporation with a bad track record in the US and abroad.

    I hope that the department will reject this application outright because of the potential disastrous results on the community and sustainability of Oregon’s spring water, a public resource that should be managed for the benefit of Oregonians.

    Respectfully,

  2. vicki hood says:

    Flush twice Nestle’ needs the water.

  3. Gabriela says:

    Water Transfer Application No. 11109

    Dear Mr. Ward:

    I am writing to you to request that The Oregon Water Resource Department deny the permit application for a water exchange between the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the City of Cascade Locks.

    Although the application does not directly state that the beneficiary of the exchange will be Nestle Waters of North America, the exchange would give Cascade Locks the ability to sell the exchanged water to a Nestle water bottling plant. As an Oregon citizen, I am deeply concerned that Oregon may give away a public water resource to a corporation that will bottle it, profit from it and ship it out of the watershed.

    Opening the doors to a Nestle bottling plant would lead to a wasteful and potentially unsustainable use of a public resource and negatively impact the quality of life of nearby residents and wildlife.

    If the state agency approves the exchange, it risks creating a future water supply shortfall, putting the city of Cascade Locks at the mercy of a multinational corporation with a bad track record in the US and abroad.

    I hope that the department will reject this application outright because of the potential disastrous results on the community and sustainability of Oregon’s spring water, a public resource that should be managed for the benefit of Oregonians.

    Respectfully,
    Gabriela Volcan

  4. vicki hood says:

    Gentlemen, My waters. My decision. I say no to selling wild waters. There is so little left for wildlife and the beauty of Oregon. Someone is getting payola here. It will be exposed. Kind of sickening, cattlemen get the lands and Oregon people can take a flying leap if they think waters are any safer. This is not China. Sincerely, Vicki Hood

  5. vicki hood says:

    Gentlemen, My waters, my decision. I say no to selling wild waters. There is so little left for wildlife and the beauty of Oregon. Someone is getting payola here. It will be exposed. Kind of sickening, cattlemen get the wildlands and the Oregon public can take a flying leap if they think waters are any safer. This is not China. Sincerely, Vicki Hood

  6. Concerned Oregonian says:

    I would like a little more information about what is going on with this situation. Where exactly is the water coming from and who exactly will that effect? What evidence is there to support your claim that this would be bad for environment and watershed, ect..? I don’t doubt that Nestle’ is up to no good and that this could have a disasterous effect on Oregonians in the Gorge but I think you would make a better case with more information. Good Luck

  7. [...] water and how much does this compare to what the company is offering Cascade Locks?”  Sierra Club and Columbia Riverkeeper are also keeping a close eye on Nestle’.  Below are a few shots [...]

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